Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Melbourne anchors Australia’s southeast coast and is sheltered along the northern shores of Port Phillip Bay. This dynamic and cosmopolitan metropolis – the country’s second largest – is an enviable place to live for Melbournians and an exciting destination to explore for international tourists.

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1 Skyline of Melbourne, Australia

Spectacular! This is one of countless superlatives applicable to describe the capital of Victoria plus Australia’s second largest city with 4.7 million residents. It was founded as a British colony in 1835 and named in honor of William Lamb, the 2nd Viscount Melbourne, who was UK’s Prime Minister at the time. Within two decades, Melbourne’s population and riches boomed during the Victorian gold rush. Their prosperity surged through most of the 20th century. Today, Melbourne is home to international companies, a diverse collection of the arts and sports plus is often ranked as one of the world’s most livable cities.

Station Pier, Waterfront Pl, Port Melbourne VIC 3207, Australia
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2 Port Melbourne Beach in Melbourne, Australia

International cruise ships dock at Station Pier in the City of Port Melbourne. This is also the terminal for the Spirit of Tasmania, a daily service to the island state 150 miles south of the mainland and across Bass Strait. When you disembark from your passenger ship, this bayside shoreline is only a gangplank away. Port Melbourne Beach is perfect for sunning, swimming and kitesurfing. There are also good restaurants and cafes along Beach Street. Melbourne’s city center is about four miles away. Typically, your ship will provide a low-cost, round-trip shuttle into the Arts Precinct. Alternative transportation into CBD (downtown) included tram or bus (both Route 109) and taxi.

Port Melbourne Beach, Beach St, Port Melbourne VIC 3207, Australia
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3 Southbank and Yarra River in Melbourne, Australia

Southbank is a small neighborhood across the Yarra River from Melbourne’s Central Business District. Despite its .7 square mile size, this former warehouse and wharf precinct has experienced extraordinary development in the last few decades. The revitalization began in the 1980s with the addition of theaters and performing arts venues known as the Arts Centre Melbourne. In the 1990s, the new Southbank Promenade became the impetus for developing waterfront apartments. At the same time, an enormous convention and exhibition center plus the Crown Entertainment Complex were built. During the first decade of the 21st century, office buildings were added and so was Melbourne’s tallest skyscraper. The residential Eureka Tower defines the skyline at 975 feet with 91 floors.

Princes Bridge, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC, 3004 Australia
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4 Hamer Hall within Arts Precinct in Melbourne, Australia

Originally named Melbourne Concert Hall when it opened in 1982, this premier venue for musical performances was renamed Hamer Hall in 2004. This was a tribute to Sir Rupert Hamer. He was elected Premier of Victoria three times during the 1970s. Hamer Hall is home to the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and regularly stages the Australian Chamber Orchestra. The concert center is located at the south end of the Princes Bridge (St Kilda Road) overlooking the Yarra River. This marks the beginning of Southbank and the Melbourne Arts Precinct.

100 St Kilda Road, Melbourne VIC 3006, Australia
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5 Family of Man Sculptures within Arts Precinct in Melbourne, Australia

Among Melbourne’s over 100 outdoor sculptures are these brass ensembles next to the Arts Centre’s Theatre Building. The man and woman in the foreground are Family of Man I. The abstract trio in the background is Family of Man II. This public art by Greek native Cole Sopov was commissioned as a gift by John and Agita Haddad and erected in 1984.

128 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3006, Australia
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6 Theatre Building within Arts Precinct in Melbourne, Australia

The most visibly intriguing architecture in the Arts Centre Melbourne complex is the Theatre Building. Beneath this dramatic, 531 foot lattice spire –designed by architect Sir Roy Burman Grounds and opened in 1984 – are three performing arts venues. The enormous stage of the State Theatre hosts operas, ballets and plays for audiences up to 2,077. The adjacent Playhouse is more intimate with 822 seats. It also features plays plus dances. The third facility beneath the bird-like wings of the Arts Centre is the Fairfax Studio. This 376 seat theatre stages smaller productions often by resident actors.

128 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3006, Australia
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7 NGV International within Arts Precinct in Melbourne, Australia

The National Gallery of Victoria is Australia’s largest museum. Dedicated to acquiring and displaying art since 1861, the NGV’s collection of over 70,000 pieces is displayed in two locations. This one – on St Kilda Road within the Melbourne Arts Precinct – is NGV International. As its name implies, worldwide artists are represented from Europe, Asia and Mesoamerica plus Greek and Egyptian artifacts. Recognizable names include works by Picasso, Monet, Rembrandt, Renoir and Rodin. The sibling facility, NGV Australia, is located across the river in Federation Square.

180 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3006, Australia
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8 Central Business District of Melbourne, Australia

Central Business District of Melbourne, Australia
As opposed to calling their center cities downtown, Aussies refer to them as the Central Business District. Melbourne’s rectangular CBD is very compact and a walkable 2.4 square miles. Both the east and west sections defined by Swanston Street are encircled by parks. Most of Melbourne’s 42 skyscrapers over 490 feet and five of Australia’s tallest structures are huddled in this area. The Yarra River creates CBD’s southern border during its 150 mile flow.

Princes Bridge, St Kilda Rd, Melbourne VIC 3004 Australia
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9 Flinders Street Station in Melbourne, Australia

Elaborate train terminals were constructed worldwide from the 1880s until the 1920s. Melbourne’s landmark Flinders Street Station – created to replace the 1854 Melbourne Terminus – was built in 1909 at the heart of this golden era. The exterior’s French Renaissance design features copper domes, gray granite and beige stone, intricate friezes and a clock tower. Unlike most stations around the world that have experienced declined traffic or closed, Flinders Street serves almost 100,000 people daily.

Flinders Street Station, Flinders St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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10 St Paul’s Cathedral in Melbourne, Australia

In the mid-19th century, St Paul’s Parish Church occupied this central location. As the city grew, so did the congregation for the Anglican Church of Australia. William Butterfield was retained to design an impressive Gothic Revival replacement. St Paul’s Cathedral was consecrated in 1891. These twin steeples, along with the 312 foot central Moorhouse Spire, were added in 1933. At the time, this exquisite sandstone church was Melbourne’s tallest building.

209 Flinders Lane, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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11 NGV Australia in Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia

Above the train tracks leading to Flinders Street Station is Federation Square. Occupying most of the elevated space is NGV Australia. This second facility of the National Gallery of Victoria has a collection of over 26,000 works by Australian artists dating back to the Aboriginal people. Also called the Ian Potter Centre, the fascinating range of exhibits requires 20 galleries and 64,500 square feet to display. The visually dramatic museum was designed by Roy Grounds and opened in 1968.

Federation Square, Flinders St & Russell Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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12 Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia

Nickelodeons and vaudeville shows were the rage during the 1900s and 1910s while short motion pictures were shown in small, storefront theatres. That dramatically changed with the advent of the movie palace. The trend for building luxurious, atmospheric and often fanciful venues peaked in the late 1920s. Melbourne’s State Theatre – which opened in 1929 – is a classic example. Architect John Eberson’s design is Moorish Revival. The façade has a minaret-style tower, statues of mythical creatures and 161 foot cooper dome. Inside, audiences were awed by the Greek and Roman statuary, mosaics and columns plus the sky-like ceiling canopying the huge stage and plush seating for 3,371 people. Since an extensive remodeling in 2017, the Forum Theatre features concerts, comedy and dance performances.

154 Flinders St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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13 Urban Art Extravaganza at Hosier Lane in Melbourne, Australia

Almost every big city has street art. Often the graffiti is a visual eyesore. A few progressive communities have embraced talented artists to create beautiful murals. None compare to Hosier Lane in Melbourne. Enter this haven for spray cans along Flinders Street across from Federation Square. Every inch of this web of bluestone alleys is a forever-changing urban canvas. Some qualifies as art while others are nothing more than colorful scribbles. But judging from the crowds all taking photos, this is the city’s most popular attraction.

Hosier Lane, Melbourne VIC 3004, Australia
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14 Melbourne Town Hall Clock Tower in Melbourne, Australia

Although Melbourne was designated as a town in 1842, it would be a dozen years before the mayor and local officials could move into government headquarters. The first building did not last long. It was torn down in 1867 in anticipation of a quick completion of its replacement. Twenty years later, the new Melbourne Town Hall was finished based on the Second Empire design of Joseph Reed. The namesake for this Prince Alfred’s Tower was the second son of Queen Victoria and Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha from 1893 until 1900. Melbourne Town Hall is now a special event venue ranging from small private parties and wedding receptions to concert and theatre performances.

90-130 Swanston St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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15 Manchester Unity Building in Melbourne, Australia

The Style Moderne form of architecture was born at the Paris World’s Fair in 1925. Soon it was renamed Art Deco in recognition of the French event called Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes. Architects worldwide were inspired through the 1930s. Marcus Barlow’s interpretation of the style is probably the best example of Art Deco in Australia. The prominent tower of the Manchester Unity Building stands 210 feet. Its ribbed façade is clad with terracotta faience tiles. Equally impressive is it required less than a year in 1932 to construct. Critics claim it is a copy of the Tribune Tower in Chicago.

220 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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16 City Ambassadors in Melbourne, Australia

Melbourne is Australia’s second largest city with 4.7 million people. So it is easy to get confused when exploring downtown’s core like this intersection of Bourke and Swanston Streets. “No worries,” as the Aussies say. Just look for a volunteer in a red uniform. Any one of the City Ambassadors will be happy to answer your questions and provide directions.

Swanston St & Bourke St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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17 State Library of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia

Australia’s first public library was founded in 1854. Within two years, this Neoclassical design by Joseph Reed opened to accommodate their initial 3,800 titles plus a museum and art gallery. Wings were added as the State Library of Victoria’s collection swelled to over two million items. In 1968, the central library became the sole tenant of this Swanston Street landmark. Extensive renovations occurred from 1990 through 2015. In the center of the Forecourt (on right) is a statue of Sir Redmond Barry, a Victoria judge in the 19th century. Behind it is a copy of Emmanuel Frémiet’s Joan of Arc (Jeanne d’Arc) erected in 1907.

328 Swanston St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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18 St George and the Dragon at State Library of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia

The origin of St George and the Dragon is debated but the story is consistent. When a Libyan community was plagued by a dragon, the residents agreed to sacrifice children chosen by lottery. When the king’s daughter was selected, Saint George charged the beast on horseback and speared it with his lance. In gratitude, the townspeople converted to Christianity. In 1889, this moment of inspirational bravery was captured in this bronze sculpture by Joseph Edgar Boehm and erected on the Forecourt of the State Library of Victoria.

328 Swanston St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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19 Exhibition Fountain in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Carlton Gardens is a rectangular, 64 acre greenspace at the northeast corner of Melbourne’s downtown. The park – designed in the Gardensque style by William Sangster – is filled with exotic plants, trees, promenades, the Grand Allée, two lakes and historic buildings including the Royal Exhibition Building. Among the fragrant flowers in the South Gardens is the 33 foot Exhibition Fountain, created by German sculptor Joseph Hochgurtel for the 1880 World’s Fair. Dancing around the basin are four youthful figures and allegories representing industry, commerce, arts and science. Supporting the Portland cement basin are mermen.

Carlton Gardens, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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20 Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

The Royal Exhibition Building is the grand centerpiece of Carlton Gardens. This UNESCO World Heritage Site was created in 1880 for the Melbourne International Exhibition, a six- month World’s Fair that attracted nearly 1.5 million people. This was also the location of the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition in 1888. When Australia became a commonwealth in 1901, the REB hosted the first Australian Parliament here and their subsequent meetings until 1927. Although the grand ballroom was demolished in 1979, the rest of this historic building is still used as an exhibition hall.

9 Nicholson St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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21 Royal Exhibition Building Dome in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Does the Great Hall dome of the Royal Exhibition Building look familiar? It should. Joseph Reed admitted his design was inspired by the Italian Renaissance style of Il Duomo di Firenze (Florence Cathedral). This prolific, 19th century Englishman was equally comfortable with many types of architectural designs. Among his local credits are the Melbourne Town Hall in the Second Empire style and the Neoclassical look of the State Library of Victoria.

9 Nicholson St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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22 French Fountain in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

The elegant French Fountain in Carlton Gardens was also created to help celebrate the Melbourne International Exhibition of 1880. Beneath the twin scalloped basins are dolphins supported by youthful figures. Originally located in The Fernery greenhouse, this creation of David Syme and Company now adorns the South Gardens near Nicholson Street. It sparkles in the sun after a 2014 restoration.

11 Nicholson St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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23 Melbourne Museum in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

The post-modernist style of Melbourne Museum is in sharp contrast to the Royal Exhibition Building, its neighbor within Carlton Gardens. This plank-like canopy extends over the entrance of Australia’s largest museum and protrudes toward Nicholson Street. Among the permanent displays are the Science and Life Gallery featuring creatures dating back to the dinosaur age and the Forest Gallery with exciting wildlife. The history sections traces Victoria’s and Melbourne’s past to the Aboriginal people. One visit is never enough because Melbourne Museum is consistently introducing temporary exhibits.

11 Nicholson St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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24 IMAX Melbourne in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Since the 70 mm film technology was created in the late 1960s, large format IMAX movies have been delighting audiences. They are now shown in over 1,200 theaters in 75 countries. The IMAX Melbourne is among the finest. Its screen size measures 104 feet wide by 75 feet tall accompanied by 15,000 watts of digital surround sound. That is so incredible you will not be able to hear yourself scream, “Awesome!” IMAX Melbourne is part of the attached Melbourne Museum in Carlton Gardens.

IMAX Melbourne, Rathdowne St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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25 Westgarth Fountain in Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

The third fountain in Carlton Gardens is not ornamental like the other two but a drinking fountain. Water spouts from the heads of emus in the corners. Above them are embracing kangaroos. Both animals are indigenous to Australia and featured prominently on the country’s coat of arms. The fountain’s namesake is William Westgarth, a Scottish businessman and member of the Victorian Legislative Council in the mid-19th century. He gifted this pink granite artwork to the city for the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition in 1888.

9 Nicholson St, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
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26 Coles Fountain at Parliament Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

A lovely wedge of greenery formed by Albert and Nicholson Streets is Parliament Gardens, named after the adjacent Parliament House. William Guilfoyle designed this pleasant landscape in 1856. The park’s unique feature is Coles Fountain, created by Robert Woodward in 1981. Visitors love walking into its u-shaped, 9.8 foot tall steel framework to be surrounded by the ambiance of cascading water as they take selfies. Unfortunately, this Victorian garden is not always open to the public.

489-531 Albert Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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27 Princess Theatre in Melbourne, Australia

Astley’s Amphitheatre was built in the mid-19th century to entertain the influx of prospectors and miners during the gold rush. After the property was expanded in 1857, it became the Princess Theatre and Opera House. In 1885, William Pitt was hired to create a new, Second Empire façade while George Gordo designed the lavish interior. Since then, the Princess Theatre has had multiple owners and refurbishments. The venue mostly presents popular musicals. Its longest running production was the “Phantom of the Opera.”

163 Spring St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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28 Parliament House in Melbourne, Australia

When the Victorian Constitution was approved by the United Kingdom in 1855, Victoria’s bicameral legislature was established. This sparked the need for the Parliament House. By the end of the year, construction of the Chambers began based on the Neoclassical design of John Knight and Peter Kerr. Four phases were competed through 1892 and the fifth was added in 1929. Except for the years 1901 through 1927 when occupied by the Parliament of Australia, this Victorian Heritage Register building has served the Parliament of Victoria. The governmental body consists of the Queen, Victoria’s governor, 88 members of the lower house and 40 in the upper house.

Parliament House, Spring Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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29 Hotel Windsor in Melbourne, Australia

During much of the Victoria era (1837 – 1901), luxurious hotels were built adjacent to major railway stations. Often the terminal and hotel were owned by the railways. Shipper George Nipper saw a chance to capitalize on this trend and the Victoria gold rush by commissioning Charles Webb to design an elaborate Renaissance Revival hotel. He appropriate called it The Grand when it opened in 1883. For decades, the Duchess of Spring Street catered to politicians, social elite plus the rich and famous. Over time, the property was expanded, changed ownership and names, witnessed declines and revitalizations. In 2008, it was rebranded as Hotel Windsor after the famous castle outside of London. To enjoy this unique, 5-star experience – and their afternoon tea – just walk beneath the male and female figures above the entrance. These allegories representing Peace and Plenty were created by sculptor John Mackennal.

111 Spring St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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30 St Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne, Australia

Although St Francis Church is Victoria’s oldest Catholic church (built in 1845), St Patrick’s Cathedral is the grandest in scale. This seat of the Archdiocese of Melbourne and minor basilica has a Gothic Revival design with twin spires reaching 344 feet. Since the cathedral was consecrated in 1897 and finished in 1939, it has had the distinction of being Australia’s largest church. The namesake is Saint Patrick, a 5th century Irish bishop commonly called the “Apostle of Ireland.”

1 Cathedral Pl, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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31 Old Treasury Building Museum in Melbourne, Australia

Soon after gold nuggets were discovered in the town of Clunes in 1850, one of the world’s most prosperous gold rushes was on. Prospectors raced in. Melbourne’s population increased ten-fold and so did its riches. The city quickly repaid all of its British debt and invested in elaborate architecture. One of those buildings was needed to stockpile the gold. The Victorian Government Treasury opened in 1862 based on the Renaissance Revival design of a teenage architect, John James Clark. After it was vacated in 1878, this became the Old Treasury Building. The current museum has many fascinating displays including old bullion vaults and an exhibit titled, “Built on Gold.”

20 Spring St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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32 Treasury Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Wedge between the Old Treasury Building and the Fitzroy Gardens is 14 acres of tranquility at the base of Melbourne’s skyscrapers. In 1867, while Clement Hodgkinson was head of the Lands Department, he reshaped this former swampland with crossing walkways resembling UK’s Union Jack. He then lined the park with trees that are now mature and deafen the city noise. Surrounding this pond are several monuments including a tribute to John F. Kennedy. The memorial has a bas-relief of the former U.S. president by Raymond B. Ewers.

Treasury Gardens, 35-51 Spring St, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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33 Conservatory in Fitzroy Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

Another of Melbourne’s magnificent Victorian parks is Fitzroy Gardens. Clement Hodgkinson also created this grid-shaped landscape with its peaceful paths during the mid-19th century. Gardner James Sinclair transformed the former swamp into a woodland lined with weeping willows, shade trees and flower beds. Fascinated by horticulture? Then you will not want to miss visiting the Conservatory inside of this 1930, Spanish Mission style greenhouse. Outside is the Diana and the Hounds Fountain sculpted by William Leslie Bowles in 1940.

The Conservatory, Fitzroy Gardens, 230/298 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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34 Cooks’ Cottage in Fitzroy Gardens in Melbourne, Australia

British Royal Navy Captain James Cook was the first to map the New Zealand coastline and to reach Australia aboard his HMS Endeavour in 1770. He was born in 1728 and given his Scottish father’s name. His mother was Grace Pace. He left Yorkshire, England in 1745 and a decade later his parents built this modest home. In 1934, Cook’s Cottage was shipped to Melbourne and reassembled in Fitzroy Gardens. Period-costumed guides provide tours through this historic abode complete with vintage furniture and encircled by an English garden

Cooks’ Cottage, Fitzroy Gardens, Wellington Parade, East Melbourne VIC 3002, Australia
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35 National Sports Museum in Melbourne, Australia

Within the Melbourne Cricket Ground inside Yarra Park is the National Sports Museum. As the name applies, the facility exhibits the highlights of Australia’s professional, nonprofessional and Olympian sports, including the Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The MCG has also been an active stadium since opening in 1853. With over 100,000 seats, the world’s 10th largest stadium has hosted several Olympic and international games plus frequent matches for the Melbourne Cricket Club.

Melbourne Cricket Ground, Brunton Ave, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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36 William Barak Bridge in Melbourne, Australia

William Barak Bridge is part of a pedestrian and cyclist path connecting the Melbourne Cricket Ground within Yarra Park to Birrarung Marr heading towards Federation Square and the CBD in the background. The namesake for this four-stage, 1,722 foot truss bridge is William Barak. He was the last of the Wurundjeri when he died in 1903. They were a clan of Aboriginal people who initially inhabited today’s Melbourne.

William Barak Bridge, Melbourne VIC 3004, Australia
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37 Federation Bells in Melbourne, Australia

Part of the celebration of Australia’s Centenary of Federation was the installation of the Federation Bells on Australia Day in 2002. These 39, bronze upturned bells created by Dr. Anton Hasell are located on the middle terrace of Birrarung Marr. Three times a day, they provide a concert by Australian musicians. But anyone can create and submit a composition for consideration by visiting federationbells.com.au.

Federation Bells, 100 Batman Ave, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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38 Lower Terrace of Birrarung Marr in Melbourne, Australia

Birrarung Marr is a crescent-shaped, 20 acre park on the north bank of the Yarra River just south of city center. Within its uniquely-designed three terraces are greenspace, outdoor sculptures and ArtPlay, an interactive creative center offering workshops and artistic performances for grade-school children. On the lowest level is this scenic, riverside walkway stretching from the Swan Street Bridge to the Princes Bridge. During your relaxed stroll, you will enjoy terrific views of the Arts Precinct and Southbank’s skyline.

Birrarung Marr, Lower Terrace, Melbourne VIC 3004, Australia
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39 Immigration Museum in Melbourne, Australia

The Aborigines lived in Australia for an estimated 40,000 years. They now represent about 3% of the country’s population. So the rest of the people have ancestral roots stemming from immigration beginning in the early 19th century. Their stories – and the historic events that sparked the greatest influx of people – are the theme of the Immigration Museum. It is located in the Old Customs House dating back to 1876. Appropriately, its architect was a Scottish immigrant. Peter Kerr also designed the Parliament House in Melbourne.

Immigration Museum, 400 Flinders St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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40 Enterprize Landing Memorial in Melbourne, Australia

On August 30, 1835, Tasmania passengers aboard a schooner named Enterprize were the first non-Aboriginal pioneers to settle on the north bank of the Yarra River near today’s Immigration Museum. This row of ship prow figureheads commemorates the historic landing. They were erected in the riverside Enterprize Park in 1985 to help celebrate the city’s 150th anniversary. Initially, the settlement was called Dootigala. Soon it became Batmania in honor of John Batman who first explored the area. In 1837, it was renamed Melbourne.

Enterprize Wharf, William St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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41 SEA LIFE Melbourne Aquarium in Melbourne, Australia

SEA LIFE Melbourne Aquarium opened in 2000. The attraction exhibits over 1,000 forms of marine life and 550 plus species from the coastal waters of Australia as far south as the Antarctica, home of the Gentoo and King penguins. Kids love the Rockpools, Bay of Rays and Coral Caves. The most popular feature is the half million gallon Oceanarium where guests feel submerged among the swimming creatures, aquatic plants and colorful reef. From the exterior, the Life Centre building resembles a ship anchored along a Yarra River quay.

SEA LIFE, King St & Flinders St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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42 Crown Entertainment Complex in Melbourne, Australia

This enormous facility along the Yarra Promenade in Melbourne’s Southbank measures an impressive 5.5 million square feet. Inside the Crown Entertainment Complex are a casino, four hotels and a bevy of restaurants, bars, nightclubs, an arcade, bowling alley and lots of retail stores. Competitive card fans will recognize this as the annual venue for Aussie Millions – the richest poker tournament in the Southern Hemisphere – and the World Series of Poker Asia-Pacific.

8 Whiteman St, Southbank VIC 3006, Australia
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43 Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre in Melbourne, Australia

Prominent along the South Wharf Promenade is the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre. Since these sibling properties conceived by architect Denton Corker Marshall were opened in the 1990s, they have provided over 3.4 million square feet of premiere meeting space. On the left is the glass Spencer Street Footbridge. It was attached to the 1930 cantilever girder bridge of the same name in 1998. These are just a few of the sites tourists enjoy during a sightseeing adventure along the Yarra River offered by Melbourne River Cruises.

1 Convention Centre Pl, South Wharf VIC 3006, Australia
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44 Polly Woodside in Melbourne, Australia

At the South Wharf next to the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre is the Polly Woodside. No, this tall ship is not a replica. This seasoned veteran of the seas was launched from a shipyard in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1885 by Marian “Polly” Woodside, the wife of the William J. Woodside and Company’s owner. The barque sailing vessel then circumnavigated the world 17 times. The primary mission of her three masts was to carry coal and wheat within her iron haul between England and South America.

21 South Wharf Promenade, South Wharf 3006 VIC, Australia
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45 Seafarers Bridge in Melbourne, Australia

Seafarers Bridge connects the World Trade Centre in the CBD with the Melbourne Convention Centre on the Southbank. The asymmetrical arches canopying the steel, cable-stayed bridge invite pedestrians and cyclists to traverse this 246 feet span over the Yarra River. The project was designed by Grimshaw Partners and opened in 2009.

Seafarers Bridge, Siddeley St, Docklands VIC 3008, Australia
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46 Yarra’s Edge and River Precinct in Melbourne, Australia

If you like living on the edge, then perhaps Yarra’s Edge is for you. This Docklands development west of South Wharf and starting below the Jim Stynes Bridge is one of Melbourne’s newest neighborhoods. A cluster of apartment and townhouse buildings are parallel to the Marina YE and align along the one-mile River Esplanade. The first of the nine Yarra’s Edge residential towers opened in 2002.

54 River Esplanade, Docklands VIC 3008, Australia
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47 Victoria Harbour in Melbourne, Australia

Just beyond the western edge of Melbourne’s Central Business District is the Docklands Precinct. Its most scenic feature is this inlet of the Yarra River called Victoria Harbour.
The former wharfs along Victoria Harbour Promenade have been transformed into a high-rise apartment neighborhood. The tallest is the Dock 5 Residential Tower. This 30 floor project completed by John Wardle in 2006 contains 148 luxury apartments with enviable waterfront views.

131 Harbour Esplanade, Docklands VIC 3008, Australia
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48 Etihad Stadium in Melbourne, Australia

Facing Victoria Harbour in the Docklands Precinct is Etihad Stadium. In addition to staging special events such as concerts, this almost half billion dollar rugby and soccer arena is home to several sports teams plus the Australian Football League. The AFL Commission governs 18 professional, Australian rules football teams. Technically called the Docklands Stadium, its current naming sponsor is Etihad Airways, an airline based in the United Arab Emirates. Seating capacity exceeds 53,000 for games and an additional 3,000 for concerts.

740 Bourke St, Docklands VIC 3008, Australia
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49 Grandparents Mural by Smug in Melbourne, Australia

Sam Bates, a.k.a. Smug, was born in Australia and lives in Glasgow. This internationally known spray painter specializes in everyday people. He has an extraordinary talent for creating giant, photo-realistic art. In 2017, he unveiled this four-story-tall mural on the wall of the former Spencer Street Power Station. Meet Smug’s grandparents.

Spencer St & Lonsdale St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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50 Supreme Court of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia

Victoria was separated from New South Wales and established as a colony in 1851. The Supreme Court of Victoria was formed the following year. Since opening in 1884, this Renaissance Revival structure with its impressive dome has served the Supreme Court, the Supreme Court Library and the Court of Appeal. Collectively, they are called the Melbourne Law Courts. The Chief Justice, President plus 60 judges in the Court of Appeal and the Trial Division have the state’s highest authority but are inferior to the High Court of Australia. Adjacent judicial facilities are the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court and the County Court of Victoria.

210 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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51 Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne, Australia

Queen Victoria Market is Melbourne’s largest shopping complex covering 17 acres and two city blocks. It is also the most historic. Since opening in 1878, its many expansions have changed little since the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Queen Vic has something for everybody, including meat, fish, produce and dairy sections plus endless stalls of general merchandise. To maintain your shopping energy, visit the food court. This Melbourne landmark is popular among locals and tourists. Vic Market is open five days a week and closed on Monday and Wednesday.

Queen Victoria Market, Queen St, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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