York, England

No tour of England is complete without a visit to York. It was founded by the Romans in 71 AD, walled in by centuries of occupiers and has maintained its medieval landmarks and charm.

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1 Introduction to York, England

Eboracum began as a fort in the 1st century and grew to the largest city in Rome’s province of Britannia while witnessing the death and ascension of Roman emperors. It was conquered by the Angles, Vikings and Normans before being granted a city charter by Richard II in 1396. Henry VIII and Elizabeth I purged its treasures and destroyed Catholic churches and monasteries during the Reformation. The Luftwaffe bombed it from the air in 1942. Despite it all, York has evolved into a delightful modern city that takes pride in its medieval landmarks. This view of York from the Station Road Walls shows the three magnificent towers of York Minster. On the left are the Western Towers finished in 1472. On the right is the 235 foot Central Tower completed in 1415. Together they are the visual pinnacle of York.

Deangate, Minster Yd, York YO1 7HH, UK
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2 Multangular Roman Tower in York, England

York was founded as Roman fortress city named Eboracum in 71 AD. This military post was used by several emperors to launch campaigns across Britannia (present day Great Britain). As its strategic value grew, so did its strength. At first it was constructed with wood. By 300 AD, it was a large stone citadel. The Multangular Tower is one of the few remaining remnants. The 19 foot tall, ten-sided defense contained a catapult. On the right is part of a 76 foot Roman wall. These historic landmarks are located in the Museum Gardens.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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3 Medieval City Wall in York, England

The Romans were the first to build a wall encircling 50 acres of Eboracum during the 1st century. Most of these fortifications were rebuilt during the Dane occupation at the end of the 9th century. Further construction occurred throughout the 12th through 14th centuries. The walls 2.5 mile circumference – more than any other English city – is dotted with medieval towers and gatehouses. The most scenic walkway is along the Station Road Walls.

405 Station Rd, York YO1 6HP, UK
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4 St Mary’s Abbey Ruins in York, England

During the late 11th century, Alan Rufus was one of the richest Norman landholders in Yorkshire. In 1088, he and King William II founded a Benedictine monastery in York called St Mary’s Abbey. The first church dedicated to St. Olave was built soon afterwards but then rebuilt almost two hundred years later. The Abbey Church, designed by Simon de Warwick, was grand in style and scale. The nave was 350 feet long. The abbey was plundered and destroyed in 1539 as a consequence of the English Reformation. In the early 18th century, many of its stone blocks were repurposed for other construction around York. All that remains today are sections of the north and west walls.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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5 William Etty Tomb near St Mary’s Abbey in York, England

Walking among the ruins of St Mary’s Abbey in the Museum Gardens is a visual treat. It is easy to see how magnificent this church must have been when it was finished in 1295. What is easy to overlook is behind this arched gate. There in the graveyard of the adjoining St Olave’s Church is the tomb of William Etty. He was a local painter (1787 – 1849) who became famous with his depictions of nudes. The largest collection of his work is exhibited at the York Art Gallery.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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6 Yorkshire Philosophical Society in York, England

The Yorkshire Philosophical Society was founded by a handful of prominent York citizens in 1822. The organization’s mission was to disseminate their knowledge of natural sciences and history. In the late 1820’s, they conceived of building the Yorkshire Museum to house their combined private collections. For a time, YPS was also responsible for maintaining the adjacent ruins of St. Mary’s Abbey. Another major contribution of the charitable society has been their efforts to save and restore many of York’s historic landmarks. This building called The Lodge remains their headquarters near the entrance to Museum Gardens.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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7 The Yorkshire Museum in York, England

The Yorkshire Museum was inspired by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society’s desire to display and manage their archeological and geological collections. They were granted ten acres of land surrounding St. Mary’s Abbey for its construction with the stipulation they also create a botanic garden. William Wilkins was hired as the architect for its Greek Revival design. The museum opened in 1830. Since then, the collection has grown into over one million items in the sciences of biology, geology, astronomy and archeology. The Museum Gardens were completed soon afterwards under the supervision of John Naesmyth. Ownership of both was transferred to the city in 1961 and is now managed by The York Museums Trust.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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8 Clifford’s Tower in York, England

Two years after William the Conqueror became the first Norman king of England in 1066, he commissioned a wooden, motte-and-bailey castle be built in York. Within a year it was destroyed by the Vikings. Not to be deterred, William I had it rebuilt with greater fortifications including a moat. When King Henry III reconstructed it again during his reign from 1216 through 1272, this limestone keep was added. Master Mason Henry de Rayns gave it a unique design with four semi-circles called quatrefoil. It was originally called King’s Tower. It was renamed as a tribute to Henry Clifford, 5th Earl of Cumberland. His Royalist forces defeated the Parliamentarians here in 1643 while defending the throne of King Charles I. This medieval landmark atop a motte in center city is one of the few structures remaining of York Castle.

3 Tower St, York YO1 9RZ, UK
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9 York Castle Museum in York, England

As York Castle lost its defense purpose, sections were converted into a garrison. These were replaced early in the 18th century. The first to open in 1705 was a county jail. Then a female penitentiary was added in 1783 based on a Neoclassical design of John Carr. They were later combined into the Debtors’ Prison. The facilities closed in 1929. Nine years later, the York Castle Museum was founded by Dr. John L. Kirk and took residence here. The museum’s most famous exhibit is Kirkgate. The curators have painfully reconstructed a cobblestone Victorian street. All of the shops, businesses, a schoolroom and more are patterned after actual premises in York from 1870 through 1901. It is a delightful walk back in time.

Eye of York, York, YO1 9RY, UK
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10 Debtors’ Prison Lantern in York, England

The Debtors’ Prison was built on the grounds of York Castle in 1705. As the name implies, it incarcerated people for not paying their obligations yet it also held hardened criminals. Curiously, its English Baroque design was drafted by William Wakefield. He was a lawyer and not an architect. Even more curious is the clock below the lantern. You will notice it only has one hand. It was created in 1716 by John Terry. This former prison is now part of the York Castle Museum.

Eye of York, York, YO1 9RY, UK
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11 Eye of the Ridings in York, England

This grassy area in the core of the former York Castle was created in 1777. It soon got the name Eye of the Ridings because officials of administrative counties were sworn in here. Historically, Yorkshire had three ridings. This government structure ended in 1972. Now the square called Castle Green accommodates a different type of riding. A frequent feature is this Victorian Carousel operated by G. Warrington & Sons. “Galloping Horses” was built in 1893.

14 Tower St, York YO1 9SA, UK
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12 Bootham Bar in York, England

During the Middle Ages, access to the walled-in city of York was through one of four main gatehouses and two small ones. These are called a bar. Nearest York Minster is the Bootham Bar. Some of its construction dates back to the 11th century although most of what is seen today is from renovations in the 14th and 19th century. As you walk past the gate, picture this gruesome moment in history. During the English Civil Wars, Charles I was executed by the English Parliament in 1649. It wasn’t until 1660 that his son, Charles II, was recognized as the King of England, Scotland and Ireland. During the follow years known as the Restoration, the new king forgave all political treason except those involved in his father’s beheading. In retaliation, three heads of rebels were displayed on the third level of Bootham Bar in 1663.

2 Bar Ln, York YO1 6JU, UK
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13 Roman Emperor Constantine Statue in York, England

When Constantius I died in Eboracum (the Roman predecessor to York) in 306 A.D., his son was declared to be Augustus, the new Roman emperor. Constantine the Great was a spectacular military leader throughout his reign ending in 337. He was also the first emperor to embrace Christianity, a significant reversal of the bloody religious persecution by Emperor Diocletian who died in 305. This statue of the Emperor Constantine by Phillip Jackson was gifted by the York Civic Trust in 1998. It is positioned near the south entrance of York Minster. Interestingly, a bust of Constantine I was found while excavating Stonegate in York. Historians believe it dates from the early 4th century.

Precentor’s Ct, York YO1 7HH, UK
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14 Brief History of York Minster in York, England

Several churches stood on this site before York Minster. The earliest were finished in 627, 637, the late 8th century and 1080. Building of the current cathedral began in 1220 under the orders of the Archbishop of York, Walter de Gray. In 1472 – over 250 years later – it was considered finished. Throughout its history, it was plundered during the English Reformation, threatened by civil war, suffered from fires in 1829, 1840 and 1984 and been endangered of collapse. On each occasion, the treasured landmark was restored. Measuring 524 feet long and 222 feet wide, it is Northern Europe’s second biggest Gothic Cathedral. This matches the Archbishop of York’s second highest rank in the Church of England.

Deangate, Minster Yd, York YO1 7HH, UK
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15 South Façade of York Minster in York, England

The York Minster’s southern façade was constructed in 1250 with an Early English Gothic design. The magnesian limestone glistens in the sunshine. The elegant centerpiece is the Rose Window, designed and created in 1515 by Robert Petty to celebrate the union of Lancaster and York. The wheel contains about 7,000 pieces of stained glass. Ravaged by fire in 1984, craftsmen toiled three years to reassemble 40,000 shards back into this beautiful work of religious art.

Deangate, Minster Yd, York YO1 7HH, UK
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16 West Façade of York Minster in York, England

The Great West Window is also called the Heart of Yorkshire. The stunning, heart-shaped tracery contains 129 pieces. The lacey masonry was crafted by Ivo de Raghton in 1338. It was painstaking reproduced during the 1980s. Flanking the front entrance are twin towers. Graceful pinnacles crown their 196 foot height. Inside of their two belfries are 35 bells

Deangate, Minster Yd, York YO1 7HH, UK
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17 Kohima War Memorial in York, England

Roger de Pont l’Évêque became the Archbishop of York in 1154. He is credited with rebuilding York Minster after it was ravaged by fire. This arcade was constructed in the late 12th century as part of his Archbishop’s Palace. In 1987, these ruins in Dean’s Park were dedicated by Queen Elizabeth as the Kohima War Memorial. It is a tribute to the 1,400 Allied soldiers including members of the 2nd Division who died in the Battle of Kohima. It was the first ground offensive defeat of the Japanese in 1944. This turning point of WWII has been called “Britain’s Greatest Battle.”

Dean's Park, York YO1 7JQ, UK
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18 The Chapel in York, England

The Chapel was built circa 1230 as part of the Archbishop’s Palace. It was displaced in 1241 when Archbishop Walker de Gray began construction of Bishopthorpe Place. Most of the 13th century structure next to Minster York was leveled in 1814. Fortunately, The Chapel was spared for its historical significance. In June of 1483, Richard III became the King of England. As part of a royal tradition begun in 1284, he invested his only son, Edward of Middleham, as the Prince of Wales in September in this building. The ten year old died six months later. Two months after that, the 32 year old king was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field. His death with no legitimate heirs ended the House of York, a family dynasty started in 1385. The Chapel is now used as the Minster Library.

Dean's Park, York YO1 7JQ, UK
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19 The Deanery in York, England

The Dean of York is responsible for the management of York Minster. The first person to have this role from 1093 until 1135 was named Hugh. The Deanery was built in 1939 to replace an earlier residence for the Dean of York Minster. The Neo-Gregorian building in Minster Yard was designed by the firm of Rutherford & Syme. Notice the coat of arms for the Diocese of York on the front gate. The heraldic insignia features Saint Peter’s crossed keys to heaven below a regal crown. The diocese was formed in 625 AD.

1A Minster Yard, York YO1 7JJ, UK
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20 Treasurer’s House in York, England

The role of Treasurer of York Minster was established in the late 11th century. As the position evolved in importance, the treasurer was provided with a mansion. The 12th century version of the estate is gone. It was replaced by the Most Reverend Thomas Young while he was the Archbishop of York from 1561 through 1568. His descendants continued to live in the residence through the 17th century. It then became the private home of several owners until wealthy industrialist Frank Green purchased it in 1897. He hired architect Temple Lushington Moore to extensively refurbish the home and then spent 30 years filling it with period furniture and art. He also named rooms after royal visitors such as Queen Alexandra and Edward VII. The result is interesting yet eclectic. The Treasurer’s House, now owned by the National Trust, makes for a fascinating tour.

2 Chapter House St, York YO1 7JH, UK
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Horse-drawn Carriage Ride in York, England

There is something nostalgic about a team of Friesian horses proudly clopping through a city led by a coachman and footman dressed in Victorian livery with top hats. The experience is available to sightseers and also offered by funeral directors in York. The ride is especially magical and romantic if you are surrounded by flowers after exchanging vows in York Minster.

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21 York Art Gallery in York, England

Inside of this 1879 building by architect Edward Taylor is the York Art Gallery. The museum displays an extensive collection of paintings and watercolors by British, Dutch and other European artists including old masters. The artworks span over 600 years. The four medallions above the colonnade are busts of famous native sons John Carr, John Camidge, John Flaxman and William Etty. Respectively, they were an accomplished architect, musician, sculptor and painter. The large statue by George Walker Milburn was erected in Exhibition Square in 1911. It portrays William Etty. The 19th century artist is best known for his historical paintings containing nudes. Many of his best works are exhibited by the museum.

Exhibition Square, York YO1 7EW, UK
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22 Coat of Arms above King’s Manor in York, England

This is the coat of arms for Charles I (1600 – 1649). His father, James I, was the first to combine the English lion and Scottish unicorn supporters with the Irish harp when he became king of all three in 1603. The United Kingdom’s royal coat of arms still has a similar appearance. This heraldic symbol is above the door of King’s Manor. This was the earliest site of the abbots’ residence from St. Mary’s Abbey. The first house was built in 1270. It was replaced with this 15th century building. It later was the Council of the North offices and then was the governor’s house. It has been part of the University of York since 1963.

Exhibition Square, York YO1 7EP, UK
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23 University of York in York, England

This is the Centre for Medieval Studies. The postgraduate program focuses on art, literature, history and architecture from the Middle Ages. York is an outstanding environment for those studies. The centre is a department of the University of York. It is adjacent to King’s Manor, one of two locations where the university began in 1963. The other was in Heslington, a village now hosting the main campus. The highly-rated research school educates almost 17,000 graduate and undergraduate students.

Exhibition Square York YO1 7EP UK
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24 Catholic Church of St Wilfrid in York, England

A church dedicated to Saint Wilford existed in York in the late 11th century. The building was torn down in 1585, not long after the English Reformation. After that, Catholic services were held in secret until the mid-18th century. Yet it would be another 100 years before they built their “Mother Church of York.” The church’s Gothic Revival design by George Goldie opened in 1864. Adjacent to a 147 foot tower and over the front door of St Wilfrid’s Catholic Church is this magnificent tympanum with high relief sculptures.

11 High Petergate, York YO1 7EN, UK
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25 Grays Solicitors Building in York, England

There are two types of lawyers in England. A barrister pleas court cases while a solicitor handles other legal proceedings. In 1695, the first member of the Gray family became a solicitor in York. William Gray, who was born in 1751, became a partner in Graves & Gray before the end of the century. In 1843, the law firm changed its name to Grays Solicitors. In 1897, the lawyers moved into this red brick, Victorian building on Duncombe Place. Their clients include land owners, families, businesses and charities.

Duncombe Pl, City Centre, York YO1 7DY, UK
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26 Shambles Market in York, England

In 2015, Newgate Market was extensively renovated and renamed Shambles Market. Historically, this word means meat market. From the 14th through the 19th century, this street was lined with butchers who displayed their freshly cut meat outdoors on hooks. Now the pedestrian walkway is filled with over 80 stalls of flowers, crafts and produce all sold by local merchants.

5 Silver St, York YO1 8RY, UK
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27 All Saints Pavement Church in York, England

Three churches have been on this site: one from the late 11th century and another built in the 12th century. The current Church of All Saints Pavement was constructed during the 14th century. The crown-shaped, Gothic lantern of the West Tower was added in 1400. The elegant, stained-glass windows date from the 14th, 19th and 21st centuries. The latest was added in 2015 to honor those who died while serving in Afghanistan. Historically, this Church of England parish has been designated as the Guild Church plus York’s Civic Church. As a result of the latter, over 30 Lord Mayors are buried here. It is also the Regimental Church serving the Royal Dragoon Guards.

14 High Ousegate, York YO1, UK
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28 Former Yorkshire Insurance Company Building in York, England

In 1824, Yorkshire Fire & Life was founded in York and two years later created a logo featuring the York Minster. In addition to marketing insurance, the company was the city’s fire department for over 50 years. This Italianate building on Saint Helen’s Square became their headquarters in 1847. Yorkshire Insurance was acquired by General Accident in 1968. The building is now home to Harkers pub and restaurant, named after a lodging owned by Christopher Harker. Harker’s York Hotel was a prominent landmark on this square until 1929.

1 St. Helen’s Square, York YO1 8QN, UK
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29 Former St Michael’s Church in York, England

The former Parish Church of St Michael’s Church, Spurriergate, dates back to the Norman Conquest of 1088. This building was constructed in the late 12th century with additions added during the 14th and 15th centuries. The limestone façade from 1821 is dominated by large, Gothic windows. On the south side is this elegant clock. It was reconstructed in 1896. Almost 95 years later, the Spurriegate Centre – a Christian community outreach group – moved into the former church after it had merged with All Saints Pavement.

2 Church Ln, York YO1 9QT, UK
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30 The Judge’s Lodging in York, England

The site of this red brick townhouse on Lendal has a long history like so many other buildings in York. Evidence suggests the land was part of a Roman fortress before being owned by St. Wilfrids Church from 1145 until 1554. Dr. Wintringham commissioned Richard Boyle to build the current Gregorian structure as his residence in 1711. From 1806 until 1976, it accommodated judges from the Assize Courts at York Castle. That role inspired the name of The Judge’s Lodging, a five star inn that opened in 2014.

9 Lendal, York YO1 8AQ, UK
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31 Minerva Statue in York, England

Minerva was the daughter of Jupiter and the Roman goddess of drama and the arts. This 1801 sculpture by John Wolstenholme portrays her with a white owl, a symbol of her wisdom. Her left arm rests on books. This is a tribute to John Foster’s former store. The bookseller occupied this intersection of Petergate and Minster Gates from 1580 until 1607. The street is better known as Stonegate. Beneath it is an ancient road called Roman Via Praetoria.

1 Minster Gates, York YO1 7HL, UK
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32 York Theatre Royal in York, England

The site of the York Theatre Royal at St. Leonard’s Place has an interesting history. In the basement is a well built by the Romans. Part of its structure incorporates features of a hospital from the Middle Ages. Thomas Keregan founded his theater in 1734 and ten years later his wife commissioned the construction of the New Theater. In 1769, Tate Wilkenson was granted a Royal Patent and renamed the performing arts facility the York Theatre Royal. The Victorian Gothic façade features roundels of Shakespearean characters. The theater reopened in 2016 after an extensive renovation.

York Theatre Royal, St Leonard's Pl, York YO1 7HD, UK
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33 The Guildhall in York, England

Weavers were the first trade to establish a York guild in 1163. By the 15th century, there were over 80 religious and merchant guilds in the city. The Guildhall on the left was built along the River Ouse during this era so members could inspect and approve all arriving shipments. They also regulated the number of dockmen (called porters) who could handle and deliver the freight. The Guildhall was heavily bombed during the 1942 Baedeker Blitz. After an extensive renovation, it reopened in 1960. It now serves as the meeting chambers for the City of York Council.

St. Helen’s Square, York YO1 9QN, UK
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34 Former St. Sampson’s Church in York, England

The origin of St. Sampson’s Church dates back to the 11th century, although nothing remains of it except a few archeological finds. Construction of the current limestone structure began in 1405. Much of it was rebuilt in 1848. Periodic restoration continued until 1910. The church was originally dedicated to St. Sampson who became the Archbishop of York in 480. The Parish Church of St. Sampson closed in 1969. Since 1974, the building has served as a daycare facility named St. Sampson’s Center for Over 60s.

3 Church St, York YO1 8BA, UK
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35 George Leeman Statue in York, England

George Leeman was the Lord Mayor of York and a member of the city’s parliament for several terms during the 19th century. There is another reason why his statue by George Walker was erected at the York Railway Station in 1885. While a lawyer, Leman led an investigation regarding the inappropriate financial dealings of George Hudson who headed a major English railroad network. After The Railway King’s downfall, George Leeman assumed his company and merged it with three others. He then controlled the amalgamation called North Eastern Railway from 1855 until 1880. NER still operates today.

Station Rise & Station Rd, York, YO1 6FZ, UK
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36 York Railway Station in York, England

York has had three train stations in its history. The first was built in 1839 and it was rapidly replaced two years later. This terminal grew into a major hub because of its position midway between London and Edinburgh, Scotland. The third and current station was designed by the architect team of Thomas Prosser and William Peachy. The North Eastern Railway opened the facility in 1877 with pride and fanfare because it was the biggest station in Great Britain. The arches seen here are the approach into an enormous glass canopy covering most of the tracks.

York Station, Station Rd, York YO24 1AB, UK
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37 The Grand Hotel in York, England

Towards the peak of its monopolist power over nearly 5,000 miles of train lines, the North Eastern Railway Company partnered its in-house architect William Bell with Horace Field to construct its magnificent headquarters in 1906. No expense was spared on its lavish décor. After a ₤25 million restoration, this building on Station Rise reopened as The Grand Hotel & Spa, York’s only five-star accommodations.

Station Rise, York YO1 6GD, UK
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38 National Railway Museum in York, England

If you love trains, then visiting the National Railway Museum is a must-see to add to your York sightseeing itinerary. Within its 20 acres of exhibit space are over 100 locomotives plus hundreds of other rail vehicles. Together with informative displays, the museum traces the history of Great Britain’s rail transportation. It is located on Leeman Road, named after George Leemnan, the 19th century chairman of North Eastern Railways.

132 Leeman Rd, York YO26 4WT, UK
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39 Grand Opera House in York, England

In 1868, two adjoining buildings on Cumberland Street were constructed for a warehouse and a grain exchange. In 1902, architect J.P. Briggs was tasked with converting them into a venue for the performing arts. The theatre has hosted ballets, concerts, plays and of course operas. It also screened films until 1916. From 1903 until 1989, it was called variations of the moniker Empire. After a restoration in 1993, it reopened as the Grand Opera House.

2 Clifford St, York YO1 9SW, UK
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40 Lendal Bridge over River Ouse in York, England

On the left is Lendal Tower. It was built circa 1300 to extend a chain across the river to Barker Tower to prevent enemy ships from passing. Beneath it is the Lendal Bridge Landing where a ferry service crossed during the first half of the 19th century. Most were passengers headed to or from York’s first train station. Construction on a bridge began in 1861 but tragically collapsed. This Gothic version designed by Thomas Page was completed in 1863, becoming York’s second bridge over the River Ouse. In the center is an angel holding York’s coat of arms with the red cross of St. George. You will also see other heraldic shields such as the Diocese of York’s crossed keys. These symbolize Saint Peter’s role as Heaven’s gatekeeper.

Lendal Bridge, Station Rd, York YO1, UK
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41 Lendal Bridge Toll House in York, England

When the Lendal Bridge opened in 1863, a toll was charged for crossing the River Orse. The cost was a half penny for pedestrians, a penny for animals and two pence for horse-drawn carriages. This was one of two of the bridge’s Victorian Gothic tool booths. They stopped collecting fees in 1894. Both Lendal Bridge buildings are now cafes.

Lendal Bridge, Station Rd, York YO1, UK
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42 Skeldergate Bridge in York, England

York’s third bridge over the River Ouse is the Skeldergate. The three-arch, Gothic Revival design was created by Thomas Page. After his death, the project was completed by his son George in 1881. Skeldergate Bridge is not high enough for the passage of tall ships. That function was performed by the small arch on the left until 1975. It swung open using a motor operated by the toll keeper. Notice the battlements on the two pilings. These were not needed for defense but reflect the bridge’s proximity to York Castle.

7 Skeldergate Bridge, York, UK
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43 Importance of the River Orse to York, England

York was founded almost 2,000 years ago at the confluence of Rivers Floss and Ouse. These waterways helped define the city’s military, agricultural, transportation and shipping history. You can see how popular the Orse riverside is with tourists and locals. These people are enjoying a sunny afternoon at Kings Arms. It is affectionately yet accurately called “The Pub that Floods.” Fans of the paranormal also meet here for the Original Ghost Walk tour. York claims to have well over 100 active ghosts. The Ghost Research Foundation International has crowned it the world’s most haunted city.

Ouse Bridge, Bridge St, York YO1 9QU, UK
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44 St Martin Church Clock in York, England

If you are a serious shopper, you will want to stroll along one of York’s main retailer streets: Coney. Along the way you will find the medieval St Martin-le-Grand-Church. Look up to enjoy this delightful treasure. The first clock at St Martin Church was installed in 1668. This version of the Little Admiral was created in 1779 and the bracket was added in 1856. Also notice the golden face of Father Time. The timepiece was extensively restored in 2012. Since then, its eight bells chime on the hour and quarter hour.

15 Coney St, York YO1 9QL, UK
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45 Strolling along River Ouse in York, England

York is a very walkable whether you are sightseeing in city center, exploring the medieval walls or strolling along the River Ouse. Maps are accessible online or at hotels to highlight the historic landmarks plus routes to take by foot or bike. Guided tours are also available. But sometimes it is best to simply hold hands while enjoying the scenery and each other’s company.

Museum Gardens, Museum St, York YO1 7FR, UK
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