U.S. Tour 4: Minnesota – New Jersey

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Paul Bunyan Statue in Akeley, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

1 Paul Bunyan Statue in Akeley, Minnesota

To celebrate the birthplace of Paul Bunyan, sculptor Dean Krotzer created the world’s tallest statue of the famous lumberjack in 1985. If standing, this bearded woodman would be 60 feet tall. This small town in north-central Minnesota is named after Healy C. Akeley. He co-founded the Red River Lumber Company in 1893. His lumber mill was the first to personify the giant of folklore in an advertising campaign by William Laughead starting in 1916.

Broadway St E & Hulet Ave SW Akeley, MN 56433
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Fishing on Pontoon at Sunset in Annandale, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

2 Fishing on Pontoon at Sunset in Annandale, Minnesota

Minnesota is The Land of 10,000 Lakes. There are actually over 12,000 of them. After surviving the long cold winter, most residents “go to the cabin” during summer weekends to fish, boat, barbeque and listen to the loons, the state bird. Nothing completes a perfect summer day better than a perfect sunset.

9194 MN-24 Annandale, MN 55302
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South Pier Lighthouse in Duluth, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

3 South Pier Lighthouse in Duluth, Minnesota

The South Pier Lighthouse stands 44 feet tall at the end of a 1,700 foot breakwater at the mouth of the Duluth-Superior harbor. The red and white brick light was built in 1901 and automated in 1976. It is one of five Minnesota lighthouses that are still active along the shores of Lake Superior.

702 S Lake Ave Duluth, MN 55802
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Winter Ice Castle in Eden Prairie, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

4 Winter Ice Castle in Eden Prairie, Minnesota

When your winter is the second coldest in the lower 48 states, you learn to embrace it while wearing plenty of layers. One example of outdoor fun is the annual Ice Castle. In 2012, it was located in Miller Park in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. This winter wonderland was built on one acre with 30 million pounds of icicles. It was inspired by a castle Brent Christensen first created in the backyard for his children.

8250 Shoreline Dr, Eden Prairie, MN 55347
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Mary Tyler Moore Statue in Minneapolis, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

5 Mary Tyler Moore Statue in Minneapolis, Minnesota

In 1970, Mary Richards moved to Minneapolis and became the associate producer for the Six O’clock News. For seven seasons, the opening credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show froze with the actress throwing her cap in the air. TV Land sponsored this eight foot, bronze statue in 2002 to memorialize the moment. The plaque on Nicollet Mall reads, “Who can turn the world on with a smile?” Sadly, that smile is gone. Mary Tyler Moore died in 2017. Ironically, the sculptor, Gwendolyn Gillen, died two days after the TV star.

S 7th St & Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55402
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Hopperstad Stave Church in Moorhead, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

6 Hopperstad Stave Church in Moorhead, Minnesota

In 1130, the Hopperstad Stave Church was built in Vikøyri, Norway. It is still standing. This style of a wooden structure with post and lintel construction and a steep sloping roofline was popular in northern Europe during the Middle Ages. This replica plus a Viking ship are a few of the educational exhibits at the Hjemkomst Center in Moorhead. The museum’s mission is to tell the story of one-third of the state’s population with Nordic heritage. Moorhead has about 42,000 residents. The city is located in northwest Minnesota across the Red River from Fargo, North Dakota.

202 1st Ave N, Moorhead, MN 56560
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Boys Crossing Mississippi River Headwaters in Park Rapids, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

7 Boys Crossing Mississippi River Headwaters in Park Rapids, Minnesota

These two boys had lots of fun crossing the Mississippi River Headwaters at Itasca State Park in northern Minnesota. The origin of the Mighty Mississippi was first explored by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft in 1832. His expedition was guided by Ozawindib, an Ojibwe chief. The Native Americans called the source both Omushkos and Lac la Biche. Schoolcraft renamed it Lake Itasca meaning “truth head.”

Miss Headwaters Visitor Park Shevlin, MN 56676
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Gilded Quadriga at Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

8 Gilded Quadriga at Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul, Minnesota

Atop the south portico of the Minnesota State Capitol in Saint Paul is the gilded Quadriga or “The Progress of the State.” The horses represent earth, wind, fire and water. The women represent civilization yet individually they personify industry and agriculture. The man symbolizes prosperity. It was sculpted in 1906 by Daniel Chester French. He is best known for the Abraham Lincoln statue in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C

75 Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr Boulevard., St Paul, MN 55155
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Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home in Sauk Centre, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

9 Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home in Sauk Centre, Minnesota

In 1885, Harry Sinclair Lewis was born at this middle-class house in Sauk Centre, Minnesota. “Red” was tall, a loner and an avid reader who dreamed of escaping the Midwest to become a famous writer. He had early success as the editor of the Yale Literary Magazine. This was followed by a few published short stories and novels. His first blockbuster was “Main Street” in 1920. Former neighbors saw themselves in the thinly guised story of small-town life in Gopher Prairie. Six more popular novels followed by the end of the decade. In 1930, Sinclair Lewis became the first U.S. writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Learn more about this great 20th century novelist by touring his boyhood home.

810 Sinclair Lewis Ave, Sauk Centre, MN 56378
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St. Cloud Skyline along Lake George in St. Cloud, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

10 St. Cloud Skyline along Lake George in St. Cloud, Minnesota

There are 95 parks for the 65,000 people who live in St. Cloud, Minnesota. One of them is Eastman Park. Located near downtown, it offers regular community events or just a relaxing paddleboat ride around Lake George. On the right is the Cathedral of Saint Mary, a Catholic church built in 1920.

1101 17th St S, St Cloud, MN 56301
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Amber Waves of Grain in Stearns County, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

11 Amber Waves of Grain in Stearns County, Minnesota

This hay field in Stearns County, Minnesota, looks like the first two lines of “America the Beautiful.” The lyrics begin, “O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain…” Katharine Lee Bates published her poem as “Pikes Peak” on July 4, 1895. The composition would have probably drifted into obscurity if composer Samuel Ward had not written the music “Materna” in 1882. The two pieces were combined in 1910, forming one of the United States’ most patriotic songs.

19953 Co Rd 7, Clearwater, MN 55320
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History of Steamboats in Stillwater, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

12 History of Steamboats in Stillwater, Minnesota

In the late 1600s, French fur traders began arriving by canoe to the St. Croix River Valley to barter trinkets with the Ojibwe and Dakota tribes in exchange for animal pelts. Traveling was arduous. In 1838, soon after the logging boom began, the first riverboat arrived. Palmyra was captained by George B. Cole. By 1858, nearly 400 steamboats docked in St. Paul while serving regional river towns. The paddleboats carried goods and also were lavish transportation for immigrants and early settlers. Colonists were thrilled to hear the welcome whistle of an approaching stern-wheeler each spring as the ice melted. Approximately 25 steamboats made stops along the St. Croix River in the 1850s. During the second half of the 19th century, train tracks were laid in increasing numbers and better roads were built. These cause the rapid demise of steamboats. You can relive these historic times by cruising on one of five steamboats operated by St. Croix Boat & Packet. Anastasia was named after Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna, the daughter of Nicholas II, the last Emperor of Russia.

525 South Main St. Stillwater, MN 55082
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Split Rock Lighthouse in Two Harbors, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

13 Split Rock Lighthouse in Two Harbors, Minnesota

One of the most recognized and photographed locations in Minnesota is the Split Rock Lighthouse. It was built along the coast of Lake Superior in 1910. Since it was decommissioned in 1969, the lighthouse has become part of a 7.6 acre park. This State and National Historic Landmark stands on top of a dramatic, 130 foot cliff. Split Rock Lighthouse is always beautiful but especially in the autumn at sunset.

3713 Split Rock Lighthouse Rd, Two Harbors, MN 55616
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St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Waverly, Minnesota - Encircle Photos

14 St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Waverly, Minnesota

St. Mary’s has served Roman Catholics in this Central Minnesota town since it was built in 1890. The community of 1,400 people had a famous resident: Hubert H. Humphrey. He was the 38th Vice President of the United States from 1965 – 1969 while serving with Lyndon Johnson. When HHH died in Waverly in 1978, his wife of 42 years, Muriel Humphrey, completed his term as the U.S. Senator from Minnesota. Although the career politician was democratic, he earned bipartisan admiration and affection across the state.

Elm Ave & 6th St N Waverly, MN 55390
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Mississippi State Capitol Building in Jackson, Mississippi - Encircle Photos

15 Mississippi State Capitol Building in Jackson, Mississippi

Since Mississippi became the 20th state on December 10, 1817, they have had three state capitols. In 1903, the “new” one was built with Bedford limestone in the Beaux Arts style on the site of a former penitentiary. Unique features are the lion heads and glass orbs on the stone finials. At the top of the 180 foot dome are 750 lights that illuminate blind justice. When each legislative session convenes, they turn on every light: all 4,700 of them.

400 High St, Jackson, MS 39201
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WWI Doughboy Statue  in Meridian, Mississippi - Encircle Photos

16 WWI Doughboy Statue in Meridian, Mississippi

Shortly after WWI, more than 150 copies of a pressed copper sculpture called the Spirit of the American Doughboy were erected throughout the United States. The soldier is shown carrying his rifle and holding a grenade over his head. The backdrop of this statue in Meridian, Mississippi, is the Threefoot Building. In 1929, it was the town’s pride. Today, the structure stands in ruins. However, the exquisite Art Deco features can still be seen around the broken windows.

601 22nd Ave, Meridian, MS 39301
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King Kong on Hollywood Wax Museum in Branson, Missouri - Encircle Photos

17 King Kong on Hollywood Wax Museum in Branson, Missouri

Branson, Missouri, is a small town of about 11,000 people. Yet countless families converge to the 50+ attractions, theaters, museums, novelty restaurants and rides along “The Strip” (76 Country Boulevard) for wholesome fun. The list of stars that have performed in the “Live Music Capital of the World” reads like a who’s who of entertainers. Speaking of celebrities, check out the wax versions of your favorite stars at the Hollywood Wax Museum. The attraction opened in 1985 with King Kong standing on the iconic Hollywood sign.

3030 MO-76, Branson, MO 65616
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Harry S Truman Summer White House in Independence, Missouri - Encircle Photos

18 Harry S Truman Summer White House in Independence, Missouri

In 1867, the grandfather of Bess Walker purchased land in Independence, Missouri. He converted a small house into this 14 room, Victorian mansion. Bess was living here when she met Harry S Truman in 1890 at the age of six in a local elementary school. When they married in 1919, he moved in with her mother and brother. This is where he was a clothing retailer and a judge. It became a summer home during his Washington, D.C. career as senator and vice president. Then it was the Summer White House while he was the 33rd president. In 1953, he retired here until he died at 88 in 1972.

219 N Delaware St, Independence, MO 64050
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Missouri State Capitol Rotunda Dome in Jefferson City, Missouri - Encircle Photos

19 Missouri State Capitol Rotunda Dome in Jefferson City, Missouri

The Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City is adorned with exquisite, regionalism murals. The paintings by Thomas Benton portray early Midwestern life. They make even hardships seem romantic. Throughout the building is a treasure of carvings, statues, stained glass, flags, artifacts and other murals. Together they show you the history of the “Show Me State.”

201 W Capitol Ave, Jefferson City, MO 65101
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North Waiting Room of Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri - Encircle Photos

20 North Waiting Room of Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri

Trains were the premier way to travel during the Golden Age of Railroading (1900 -1950). The Pullman company made elaborate sleeper, dining, parlor and passenger cars. This fifty year period also witnessed the building of grand-scale stations such as NYC’s Grand Central Terminal. In 1914, the country’s second largest opened with lots of marble, ornate detail and three chandeliers weighing 3,000 each: Kansas City Union Station. After WWII, railroading declined and so did the K.C. station until it closed in 1985. After a $250 million renovation, the former Union Station now houses museums, theaters and restaurants. Locals use the polished floors as a walking track for exercise during inclement weather.

30 W Pershing Rd, Kansas City, MO 64108
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Gateway Arch at Night in St. Louis, Missouri - Encircle Photos

21 Gateway Arch at Night in St. Louis, Missouri

The symbol of St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Arch. The landmark is a 630 foot tall, shining ribbon of steel. The world’s tallest arch has 1,076 steps. It is easier to take the tram to the top. Although Franklin D. Roosevelt approved partial funding in 1934, the keystone was not placed until 1965. When it was finished in 1968, Vice President Hubert Humphrey had the honors of dedicating it during an opening ceremony. The $13.5 million project gets its name from the Mississippi River’s location as the gateway to the west.

50 N Leonor K Sullivan Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63102
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Spinning Steel Sculpture and Bozeman Building in Bozeman, Montana - Encircle Photos

22 Spinning Steel Sculpture and Bozeman Building in Bozeman, Montana

Star Trek fans might remember the frequent references to Bozeman in the Next Generation, Voyager, Generations and First Contact. This is where the TV and movie producer, Brannon Braga, was born. The Montana city is also where warp drive is created in 2063. This invention leads to humanity’s first contact with the Vulcans. Until then, Bozeman is a college town in an area once called, “Valley of the Flowers” by the Native Americans.

S Rouse Ave. & E Main St, Bozeman, MT 59715
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Teton County Courthouse in Choteau, Montana - Encircle Photos

23 Teton County Courthouse in Choteau, Montana

Teton County, Montana, is a cluster of small towns located where the Rocky Mountains meet the Great Plains. They are encircled by barley and wheat fields. They also have plenty of livestock, probably more than the population density of three people per mile. In the middle of a grassy roundabout in Choteau is the county courthouse. This government building was constructed with sandstone in 1906.

1 Main Ave S, Choteau, MT 59422
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Grain Elevators Storing Malting Barley in Fairfield, Montana - Encircle Photos

24 Grain Elevators Storing Malting Barley in Fairfield, Montana

The Golden Triangle is Montana’s premier grain area. Fairfield touts itself as the Malting Barley Capital of the World. Their biggest customer is Anheuser-Busch. The brewing company carefully manages the whole process. This includes selling the seed, providing agronomist advice, monitoring the fields, supervising the storage in these grain bins and testing each truckload.

Central Ave W & Park Way Fairfield, MT 59436
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Town Cafe Marquee in Gardiner, Montana - Encircle Photos

25 Town Cafe Marquee in Gardiner, Montana

If you are leaving Wyoming through Yellowstone’s North Entrance and need a family pit stop, then visit Gardiner, Montana. It has wooden, Wild West façades and marquees for its bars and shops. Many of the storefronts provide rocking chairs for watching passing cars or the mule deer, elk, bison and other wildlife meandering through this small frontier town of 850 people.

118 E Park St, Gardiner, MT 59030
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Wild Horses Resting in Meadow at Glacier National Park, Montana - Encircle Photos

Wild Horses Resting in Meadow at Glacier National Park, Montana

This mare was nuzzling her foal in an open meadow. They looked so peaceful and content. Wild horses are one of about 15 types of large animals living in and around Glacier National Park in Montana. You might also be lucky enough to see a bighorn sheep, black bear, moose, elk, deer, lynx or mountain lion. Plus, there are 70 species of smaller mammals residing within the one million acres of wilderness.

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Arduous Journey Sacajawea and Baby in Papoose Statue in Great Falls, Montana - Encircle Photos

26 Arduous Journey Sacajawea and Baby in Papoose Statue in Great Falls, Montana

The Lewis and Clark Expedition discovered the Missouri River’s Great Falls in 1805. Traveling with them from 1804 to 1806 was Sacagawea. She was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who was the explorers’ interpreter and guide. Clark called her “Janey.” In the middle of the trip from North Dakota to California, she gave birth to a son. He was nicknamed “Little Pomp.” This 9 ½ foot sculpture by Carol Grende is called “Arduous Journey.” The tribute depicts Sacajawea and her baby Jean-Baptise in a papoose. The statue was dedicated in 2010 at the Missouri River Federal Courthouse in Great Falls, Montana.

125 Central Avenue West, Great Falls, MT 59404
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Cathedral of Saint Helena in Helena, Montana - Encircle Photos

27 Cathedral of Saint Helena in Helena, Montana

The Votive Church in Vienna (Votivekirche) has stunning neo-Gothic architecture and was the inspiration for building the Cathedral of Saint Helena, Montana in 1914. The church features double spires rising 230 feet and 59 stained glass windows from Bavaria, Germany. A major benefactor was Thomas Cruse. His funeral was the first one in the church before the project was finished. The cathedral was consecrated in 1924.

530 N Ewing St, Helena, MT 59601
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Carnegie Library in Lewistown, Montana - Encircle Photos

28 Carnegie Library in Lewistown, Montana

When Andrew Carnegie sold his steel empire in 1901 for the equivalent of $6.2 billion, he wrote, “No idol is more debasing than the worship of money.” During his remaining 18 years, he became a generous philanthropist. He gave away over 75% of his wealth. Carnegie strongly believed books, knowledge and hard work were the keys to success. This outlook motivated him to provide grants to build over 2,500 libraries. Almost 1,700 of them were constructed in small U.S. towns. This library in Lewistown, Montana, was built in 1905.

701 W Main St, Lewistown, MT 59457
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Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park near St. Mary, Montana - Encircle Photos

29 Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park near St. Mary, Montana

Wild Goose Island is the centerpiece of Saint Mary Lake. This is the second largest among 130 lakes within Glacier National Park’s million acres. The Going-to-the-Sun Road flanks the northern side of this ten mile lake. Access is closed about eight months a year because snow often drifts as high as 80 feet. In the background is Little Chief Mountain. This 9,500 foot peak marks the beginning of the Rocky Mountains.

Wild Goose Island Lookout, Going-to-the-Sun Rd, Browning, MT 59417
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Pony Express Plaque at Ehmen Park Station in Gothenburg, Nebraska - Encircle Photos

30 Pony Express Plaque at Ehmen Park Station in Gothenburg, Nebraska

Next time your email is slow, think of the Pony Express. For only 18 months in 1860 and 1861, 120 riders carried mail up to 75 miles a day in a mochila (pouch), together with water, a gun and a Bible. There were 184 stations along the 1,900 mile trail stretching from Missouri to California. Two of the original stations are in Gothenburg, Nebraska. This commemorative plaque is on the Ehmen Park Station.

Pony Express Station & Museum, 1500 Lake Ave, Gothenburg, NE 69138
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Fiberglass Bison Statue at Great Platte River Road Archway near Kearney, Nebraska - Encircle Photos

31 Fiberglass Bison Statue at Great Platte River Road Archway near Kearney, Nebraska

This ten foot tall, fiberglass bison statue by Gary Ginther sits next to the Great Platte River Road Archway Monument near Kearney, Nebraska. Ted Turner, the CNN founder and owner of the nation’s largest buffalo herd on his Vermejo Park Ranch, commissioned the statue in 2002. The nearby archway resembles a covered wagon and sunset stretching 60 feet over I-80, the nation’s first interstate. The museum tells the story of westward pioneers from 1843 to 1869. The facility opened in 2000.

3060 E 1st St, Kearney, NE 68847
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Nebraska State Capitol East Warner Chamber Doors in Lincoln, Nebraska - Encircle Photos

32 Nebraska State Capitol East Warner Chamber Doors in Lincoln, Nebraska

The Warner Legislative Chamber’s doors in the Nebraska State Capitol are a beautifully carved, symbolic tribute to Native Americans. These East Chamber doors feature a stalk of corn in the center with a Thunderbird (representing rain and life) on top. On the right is an Indian standing on an otter representing medicine. On the left is a woman above a turtle symbolizing fertility. The doors weigh 750 pounds each and took six months to carve.

1445 K St, Lincoln, NE 68508
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Buffalo Bill Cody’s House in North Platte, Nebraska - Encircle Photos

33 Buffalo Bill Cody’s House in North Platte, Nebraska

Bill Cody had Buffalo added to his name after reportedly killing 4,200 bison in 18 months to feed railroad workers. The Medal of Honor winner is best known for his ten-year tour in Wild West shows. He performed with other celebrities such as Annie Oakley and Calamity Jane. In 1886, he purchased 4,000 acres in North Platte, Nebraska, and called it Scout’s Rest Ranch. You can tour his three-story, Victorian house to see many of his original furnishings and memorabilia. The property is part of a state historical park.

Scouts Rest Ranch Rd & Charlie Evans Dr, North Platte, NE 69101
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Wagon Train at Pioneer Courage Park in Omaha, Nebraska - Encircle Photos

34 Wagon Train at Pioneer Courage Park in Omaha, Nebraska

Across six blocks in downtown Omaha, Nebraska, are more than 120 sculptures in the Spirit of Nebraska’s Wilderness and Pioneer Courage parks. This bronze, 12 foot high covered wagon stuck in a dry creek bed is one of four pioneer families heading west on May 21, 1841. The elaborate artworks by Blair Buswell and Ed Fraughton are exquisitely detailed and 1 ½ times life size. The project was sponsored by First National Bank.

N 14th St & Capitol Ave, Omaha, NE 68179
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Cactus Jack’s Casino Howdy Sign in Carson City, Nevada - Encircle Photos

35 Cactus Jack’s Casino Howdy Sign in Carson City, Nevada

This iconic neon marquee sign with its “Howdy” greeting on the money in his extended hand stands atop Cactus Jack’s Casino. Its 8,500 square feet offers 24 hours of fun on their 150 “liberal gaming machines” and two poker tables. This may sound small by Las Vegas standards. However, Carson City has ten casinos, ranking it as the fourth largest gaming center in Nevada.

420 N Carson St, Carson City, NV 89701
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Logan Shoals Vista on Lake Tahoe, Nevada - Encircle Photos

36 Logan Shoals Vista on Lake Tahoe, Nevada

Lake Tahoe is shared by Nevada and California. Stretching 22 miles and 12 miles wide, the picturesque lake is the second deepest in the U.S. at over 1,600 feet. In a word, it is beautiful. Along a drive through Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park, visitors can stop along the multiple turnouts for spectacular views. This woman enjoyed the tranquility from the Logan Shoals Vista.

1492 Lincoln Hwy, Glenbrook, NV 89413
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Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas Sign near Las Vegas, Nevada - Encircle Photos

37 Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas Sign near Las Vegas, Nevada

This diamond-shaped, 25 foot neon sign is actually in the town of Paradise, Nevada, but has been welcoming tourists to fabulous Las Vegas since 1959. And the numbers are fabulous: in 2012, nearly 40 million visitors generated $17 billion in gaming revenues. No wonder the back of the sign reads, “Come Back Soon.”

5200 S Las Vegas Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89119
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Bentonite Clay Spires at Cathedral Gorge State Park near Panaca, Nevada - Encircle Photos

38 Bentonite Clay Spires at Cathedral Gorge State Park near Panaca, Nevada

These Bentonite clay spires at Cathedral Gorge State Park near Panaca, Nevada, are beautiful. The rugged landscape was shaped by volcanic eruptions, fractures that formed mountains and valleys, a freshwater lake that disappeared, plus millions of years of wind erosion. Wonderful, buff-colored carvings stand majestically among the 2,000 acres of arid desert near the Utah boarder. You can also explore several caves. But beware: some are inhabited by creatures who growl with disapproval at the slightest intrusion.

111 Cathedral Gorge State Park Road, Panaca, NV 89042
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Omni Resort and Mount Washington in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire - Encircle Photos

39 Omni Resort and Mount Washington in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire

The Omni Hotel in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire has the historic splendor and charm from 1902 blended with modern amenities after an $80 million renovation. In the background is Mount Washington. This snow-capped peak reaches an elevation of 6,288 feet, New England’s tallest. The view is beautiful and majestic yet it is notorious for extreme weather. The mountain experiences hurricane-force winds for a third of the year. The strongest gust was measured at 231 m.p.h. In January, 2004, the temperature plunged to a wind chill of 103° below zero.

310 Mount Washington Hotel Rd, Bretton Woods, NH 03575
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New Hampshire State House in Concord, New Hampshire - Encircle Photos

40 New Hampshire State House in Concord, New Hampshire

When walking up to the New Hampshire State House in Concord, you first noticed the windows. They are square on the third floor, arched on the second and rectangular at ground level. The rest of the building has a classic Greek Revival design. Built in 1819, it is considered to be the oldest state house where the legislation still meets in their original chambers. Two of the front statues are native sons. General John Stark was a Revolutionary War hero. The other is a likeness of Daniel Webster. He was a former member of the House. Twice he declined the nomination of Vice President from two U.S. presidents who later died in office. New Hampshire became the 9th state on June 21, 1788.

107 N Main St, Concord, NH 03303
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Dartmouth College’s Baker Memorial Library in Hanover, New Hampshire - Encircle Photos

41 Dartmouth College’s Baker Memorial Library in Hanover, New Hampshire

What started as a missionary school in 1755 emerged into Dartmouth College. This is the smallest of the eight Ivy League schools. Dartmouth is frequently ranked among the top ten undergraduate programs in the country. The campus is located in Hanover. The small New Hampshire town is frequently ranked as a great place to live. The Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library was built in 1928. The design mimics Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

1929 N Main St, Hanover, NH 03755
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White Mountain National Forest near North Conway, New Hampshire - Encircle Photos

42 White Mountain National Forest near North Conway, New Hampshire

There are two scenic byways looping through the White Mountain National Forest. Also winding through the 750,000 acres is the Ellis River. The 17-mile flow begins at the 6,288 foot peak of Mount Washington. Nearby are other mountains named after eight presidents plus notables like Ben Franklin and Sam Adams. Among this gorgeous scenery are quaint villages, museums, covered bridges and tranquil landscapes.

Glen Ellis Scenic Area NH-16, Appalachian Trail, Jackson, NH 03846
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Old North Conway Railroad Station in North Conway, New Hampshire - Encircle Photos

43 Old North Conway Railroad Station in North Conway, New Hampshire

Two attractions draw tourists to North Conway, New Hampshire: the White Mountain National Forest and over 30 outlet stores of famous retailers. During the Great Depression, the local mountains became extremely popular among skiers. Most of them arrived by the Portsmouth, Great Falls & Conway Railroad. This train station was built in 1874. The landmark now offers short excursion trips under the Conway Scenic Railroad name.

38 Norcross Cir, North Conway, NH 03860
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Believe It or Not Museum and Atlantic Palace in Atlantic City, New Jersey - Encircle Photos

44 Believe It or Not Museum and Atlantic Palace in Atlantic City, New Jersey

The 1934 Monopoly game was patterned after the streets of Atlantic City. The South Jersey resort area has seen booms and declines since first developed along the ocean shores in 1853. Plans for new, mega hotels and casinos were scrapped during the Great Recession. An eye-catching “Odditorium,” sandwiched between Resorts and Bally’s Casinos on the Boardwalk, is the Ripley’s Believe it or Not Museum. Inside this wrecking ball building are over 400 exhibits of the weird and curious.

1441 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, NJ 08401
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Goldman Sachs Tower in Jersey City, New Jersey - Encircle Photos

45 Goldman Sachs Tower in Jersey City, New Jersey

This view of the Goldman Sachs Tower in Jersey City, New Jersey, was photographed from New York Bay. Also called 30 Hudson Street, the 42 floor building dominates the horizon at Exchange Place. When it was built in 2004 at the cost of $1.3 billion, the company planned to consolidate all of their 6,000 headquarter employees here. However, traders and management refused to leave their Wall Street location directly across the Hudson River. So, Goldman began leasing space in the skyscraper while offering ferry service between locations.

30 Hudson Street, Jersey City, NJ 07302
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Alexander Hall at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey - Encircle Photos

46 Alexander Hall at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

Many school buildings constructed during the 19th and 20th centuries used Collegiate Gothic architecture. Much of the Princeton University campus reflects this style. Among them at this Ivy League school is a standout, visual gem. The Richardsonian Romanesque design of Alexander Hall is outstanding. In the center is a large rose window made of Tiffany glass. Carved into its red granite walls are bas-relief figures representing learning in 36 fields of education.

Alexander Hall, 68 Nassau St, Princeton, NJ 08542
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New Jersey State House Capitol Rotunda in Trenton, New Jersey - Encircle Photos

47 New Jersey State House Capitol Rotunda in Trenton, New Jersey

Stained glass, eagles, gilded ribs and historic portraits surround the rich reds and blues of the rotunda at the New Jersey State House in Trenton. This is the second oldest capitol in continuous use. The view of the 145 foot dome is shaped by golden, ornamental grillwork in an octagon shape. It’s an excellent example of American Renaissance architecture.

125 W State St, Trenton, NJ 08608
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