Seville, Spain – One

Founded by the Romans, occupied by the Moors and conquered by a Christian king. These are a few of the historical events that molded Sevilla. In this gallery, you will explore major landmarks in Casco Antiguo (old town) and La Macarena neighborhood. The next gallery showcases the spectacular architecture from the world’s fairs in 1929 and 1992.

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1 Welcome to Casco Antiguo in Seville, Spain

Most of the city’s major landmarks are located in Casco Antiguo, the Ancient District of Seville. You will get a visual tour of them in this gallery. Many daytrippers don’t get beyond two city squares where three UNESCO World Heritage Sites are located. This is Plaza del Triunfo. Behind the horse-drawn carriage is La Giralda. This famous bell tower is attached to the Seville Cathedral seen on the left. On the other side of the plaza is the General Archive of the Indies. Behind this view is Plaza del Patio de Banderas where you will enter the Alcázar.

Plaza del Triunfo, Seville, Spain
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2 Introduction to Seville Cathedral in Seville, Spain

It took 105 years to build Catedral de Santa María de la Sede. When Seville Cathedral was finished in 1506, its measurements of 443 by 330 feet made it the world’s largest cathedral, a distinction it still holds. To give you a sense of scale, the Roman Catholic cathedral has 15 elaborately crafted doors. Inside, there are 80 side chapels, each with a decorated altar. Among the multiple tombs are two famous Spaniards: Christopher Columbus and Ferdinand III who freed Seville from the Moors and is the city’s patron saint. This World Heritage Site is worth waiting in a long line.

Av. de la Constitución, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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3 Columbus Tomb in Seville Cathedral in Seville, Spain

Christopher Columbus is one of the most recognized names in history. His voyage in 1492 redefined the globe then launched European explorations, conquests and colonization of the New World. So, when you are standing before his tomb at the Seville Cathedral, you are in awe. After his death in 1506, the remains of Cristóbal Colón were moved to several places during the next four hundred years: Valladolid (Spain), Seville, Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), Havana (Cuba) and finally back to Seville in 1898. The pallbearers sculpted by Arturo Melida represent the kingdoms of Castile, Aragon, Leon and Navara.

Av. de la Constitución, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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4 High Altar in Seville Cathedral in Seville, Spain

The interior of Seville Cathedral is magnificent in every way. The crowning glory is the world’s largest altarpiece. Craftsman Pierre Dancart spent 44 years carving Retablo Mayor from wood. The gilded high altar of Capilla Mayor (Grand Chapel) features scenes from the Old Testament, the life of Christ plus images of saints. At the bottom center is Santa Maria la Sede, the cathedral’s patron saint.

Av. de la Constitución, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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5 Archbishop’s Palace in Seville, Spain

The first diocese in Seville was established by the Romans during the 3rd century. Ferdinand III was quick to reestablish Catholicism in Seville after successfully defeating the al-Andalus in 1248. The following year, Raimundo de Losana, the bishop of Segovia, became the first archbishop of Sevilla since 860 AD. His earliest palace was expanded during the 16th century. The red, Spanish Baroque façade was created by Lorenzo Fernández de Figueroa in the 17th century. Palacio Arzobispal (Archbishop’s Palace) is located in Plaza Virgen de los Reyes adjacent to the Giralda.

Plaza Virgen de los Reyes, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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6 La Giralda Attached to Seville Cathedral in Seville, Spain

The Almohads were a Berber dynasty from North Africa. By the mid-12th century, after conquering most of Morocco and key cities in the Iberian Peninsula, they made Sevilla their capital. This prominence deserved a grand minaret. Architect Ahmad Ben Baso was hired to build it alongside of Aljama Mosque. It was finished in 1198. After the Christians captured Seville in the mid-13th century, they extended its height by more than 100 feet in a Spanish Renaissance style. At the 343 foot peak is a statue doubling as a weathervane. El Giraldillo is an allegory for Faith plus the namesake for La Giralda. To reach the observation deck, enter from Plaza Virgen de los Reyes and trudge up 35 ramps. These were not designed for handicapped tourists. Instead, the ramps allowed a muezzin (man who calls Muslims to prayer) to ride to the top of the minaret on horseback.

Calle Virgen de los Reyes, s/n, 41900 Sevilla, Spain
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7 Brief Historical Overview of Seville, Spain

While viewing the cityscape from the Giralda belfry with the Seville Cathedral in the foreground, it is a good time for a brief history lesson about Seville. According to legend, its founder was Hercules, the Greek gatekeeper of Olympus. The first settlers were Phoenician (800 to 539 BC) followed by the Romans who called their city Hispalis (means built on posts). The Vandals, Suebi and Visigoths followed in quick succession. A lasting legacy of culture and architecture was left behind by the Moors during their occupation from 712 until 1248. That was the year King Ferdinand III of Castile conquered the city as part of the Spanish Reconquista to reclaim the Iberian Peninsula for Christianity. Then Seville became a world leader during the Golden Age while colonizing the Americas. But the Great Plague of 1649 reversed their fortunes by killing half of the Sevillians. Not long after the expansion for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929 came the Spanish Civil War (1936 to 1939). This lead to Francisco Franco’s dictatorship until 1975. When Spain became a parliamentary monarchy in 1978, Seville became the capital of the Autonomous Community of Andalusia.

Pl. del Triunfo, 2, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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8 Lion’s Gate at Real Alcázar in Seville, Spain

Real Alcázar is the epicenter of 2,000 years of Sevilla’s history. The earliest building on this site dates from the 1st century, followed by a basilica built by the Visigoths (418 – 711). They were conquered by Muslim Barbers early in the 8th century. 100 years later, the Umayyads constructed an alcazaba here. This walled fortress began evolving into a palace by Al-Mu’tamid ibn Abbad during the 11th century. But it was the Almohads, starting in the 12th century, who did the most elaborate construction. Their palace was named Al-Muwarak. After their defeat in the mid-13th century, Spanish kings expanded and transformed the Islamic palace into the Reales Alcázares de Sevilla. This is 4.2 acres of historic and opulent buildings. Real Alcázar is still the royal family’s residence when visiting Seville, making it Europe’s oldest palace still used by monarchs. Your entrance into this UNESCO World Heritage Site is through this 12th century gate named Puerta del León.

Patio de Banderas, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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9 Courtyard of the Maidens at Real Alcázar in Seville, Spain

Patio de las Doncellas is a superb example of an Islamic inner-courtyard centered with a reflection pool and fountain plus encircled with arcades called a peristyle. The exquisite first level was built in the 14th century. Most people assume the Muslims originated this type of multifoil, horseshoe arch. Actually, the Syrians were the first to use it followed by the Visigoths. The concept was adapted by the Moors (711 – 1248) and then extended by the Christians during the 12th to 17th centuries in the Mudéjar style. The upper level – created with an Italian Renaissance design – was added during the first half of the 16th century by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain. The Courtyard of the Maidens is named after the Muslim leaders demands to be gifted 100 maidens annually.

Calle Dean Miranda, 1A, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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10 Gallery of the Grotesque at Real Alcázar in Seville, Spain

As you exit the backside of Real Alcázar and enter the gardens, the first visual treasure you will admire is on an elevated terrace. This is the Gallery of the Grotesque. This former Almohad wall was lavishly reimagined in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. The frescos of mythological creatures between the columns resembling coral were painted by Diego de Esquivel. Accenting the pond is a statue of Mercury, the Greek deity of industry and commerce. The mythological god was sculpted by Bartolomé Morel in 1576.

Patio de Banderas, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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11 Gardens of Real Alcázar in Seville, Spain

All of the Al-Andalus palaces preserved in Spain are surrounded by elaborate gardens. Real Alcázar is a beautiful example. Imagine strolling along a labyrinth of paths through 17 acres of sculpted bushes, fruit orchards, flower beds, Mediterranean trees and palms accented by reflection ponds, fountains and columns. Much of the garden’s appearance you will enjoy today was created by Vermondo Resta during the 16th century.

Patio de Banderas, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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12 Patio de Banderas Next to Real Alcázar in Seville, Spain

After touring Real Alcázar, most tourists are chattering with excitement about their experience and don’t notice much as they walk through Patio de Banderas. Yet it is also rich with history. This square was a Muslim fortress, a 10th century palace and an 18th century armory. It is also called the Courtyard of Flags because of its tradition of receiving kings to the Real Alcázar. Now it is a walkway back to Plaza del Triunfo. On the way, enjoy the marvelous view of La Giralda.

Plaza del Patio de Banderas, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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13 Central Post Office in Seville, Spain

While you and your partner are waiting to enter the Cathedral or Alcazar (expect long lines), take turns running to see this nearby building on Constitution Avenue. Correos y Telegrafos above the door means mails and telegraphs. This art deco edifice designed by Joaquin Otamendi and Luis Lozano became the city’s main post office when it opened in 1930. Enjoy inspecting Spain’s coat of arms. This was the country’s heraldic symbol as it appeared from 1875 until 1931 during a period called the House of Bourbon 2nd Restoration. This timeframe coincides with the reigns of King Alfonso XII and Alfonso XIII. Interestingly, the later inherited the throne before he was born.

Av. de la Constitución, 32, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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14 Monument of the Immaculate Conception in Seville, Spain

Since 1918, the Monument of the Immaculate Conception has stood in Plaza del Triunfo near Seville Cathedral. Some people mistakenly believe this name refers to the virginal conception of Christ. Instead, after a papal bull issued by Pope Pius IX in 1854, the Catholic church confirmed Mary was born free of all original sin. The statues at her feet are some of the men who pursued this dogma. In Seville, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception on December 8 is a public holiday and holy day of obligation. That is when this monument becomes the center of costumed celebrations, processions and bands.

Pl. del Triunfo, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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15 General Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain

In 1503, 11 years after Queen Isabella I of Castile financed Columbus’ first voyage, she created a board of trade. Casa de Contratación regulated all shipping to the Americas (then called the Indies). 40 years later, the Consulado de Mercaderes was formed. This merchant guild had a monopoly over goods leaving Spain and all trade conducted among the new colonies. This Spanish Renaissance building designed by Juan de Herrera was finished in 1503 to house their activities. In 1785, Casa Lonja de Mercaderes was repurposed as the General Archive of the Indies. Inside of this World Heritage Site are 80 million pages of documentation tracing the history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas. It contains such treasures as the journal of Christopher Columbus.

Av. de la Constitución, s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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16 City Hall from Plaza de San Francisco in Seville, Spain

Consistorial Palace was designed by Diego de Riaño in 1527. Although it opens at Plaza Nueva, the best view is from Plaza de San Francisco. The namesake for the square is a Franciscan monastery located here from 1268 until it was gutted by flames in 1810. Now called the City Hall of Seville, it serves at the headquarters for the Municipal Council.

Plaza de San Francisco, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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17 Plateresque Facade of City Hall in Seville, Spain

The façade of City Hall of Seville has a gorgeous Plateresque design. This architectural style evolved in Spain in the late 15th century. The impressive blend of Gothic and Renaissance elements was frequently used for churches, university and government buildings for about a century. The term means “goldsmith” because the ornate details resembling fine jewelry. You will marvel at the intricate friezes, Ionic pilasters and fluted Corinthian columns. Also notice those shaped as a male (telamones or atlantes) and females (caryatids).

Plaza Nueva, 1, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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18 Ferdinand III Monument in Plaza Nueva in Seville, Spain

This equestrian sculpture by Joaquín Bibao is a tribute to Ferdinand III. He was the King of Castile (beginning in 1217) and also León (starting in 1230) until his death in 1252. Saint Ferdinand of Castile was later canonized for reclaiming Christianity on the Iberian Peninsula (present day Spain and Portugal). His military campaign included defeating the Moors in Seville in the mid-13th century. Ferdinand III is buried in nearby Cathedral of Our Lady of Seville. The monument stands in Plaza Nueva adjacent to City Hall. Shown in the niche is a sculpture by José Lafita Diaz of Admiral Ramón de Bonifaz, the creator of the Royal Navy of Castile.

Plaza Nueva, Calle Barcelona, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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19 Royal Audiencia Building in Seville, Spain

When strolling through a major square in a city as old as Seville, you can bet each façade has an interesting story. Here is one example at Plaza de San Francisco. During the 14th century, this site was called Casa Quadra while the home of Henry II, King of Castile. During the reign of Charles I, King of Spain from 1516 until 1556, he ordered it be converted into the Royal Audiencia of Seville. When the project was finished in 1597, it was the civil and criminal courthouse for the Crown of Castile. This historic building is now the headquarters for Cajascol. This company was a savings bank until 2013 when they became a foundation focused on social work.

Pl. de S. Francisco, 1, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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20 Tourist Center and Outdoor Bar at Laredo Building in Seville, Spain

During a hot afternoon touring Seville, the outdoor tables of the Robles Laredo Restaurant at the north end of San Francisco Square is a great place for a respite. You will also find the city’s main tourist office here. Their recommendations and Internet are both free. So, enjoy a cold beer while studying a map of where to explore next. While sipping, look up at the façade of the Laredo Building. It was constructed in 1919 by architect Ramón Balbuena.

Calle Sierpes, 90, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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Flamenco Dancer in Seville, Spain

Since flamenco originated in Andalusia during the 18th century, it has become a music and dance custom in southern Spain. While the flamenco guitar (toque) plays a song (cante), it is accompanied by a dance (baile) characterized by fluid yet dramatic hand waving and feet stomping of a single dancer. This woman wearing a traditional, red dress with a frilly train was a street performer. There are several venues in Seville offering staged productions. One of the best is Casa del Flamenco.

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21 Royal Tobacco Factory in Seville, Spain

Christopher Columbus not only discovered the New World, but he was also the first European to see tobacco. During the mid-16th century, Spanish colonists established plantations and began importing the crop home. By 1614, Seville was the world’s tobacco capital. In 1728, King Ferdinand VI commissioned Sebastián Van Bocht to build the world’s largest industrial building (607 X 571 feet) surrounded by a moat (in the foreground). After it was completed in 1771, the Royal Tobacco Factory produced 75% of the cigars smoked in Europe. In 1953, the Old Tobacco Factory became the main building for the University of Seville. Over 73,000 students attend Universidad de Sevilla.

Calle San Fernando, 4, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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22 San Telmo Palace in María Luisa Park in Seville, Spain

This fabulous Baroque structure began in the late 17th century as the University of Navigators. During the mid-19th century, it became the palace of Antoine d’Orléans, the Duke of Montpensier. From 1901 until 1989, the Archdiocese of Seville used the property as a seminary. After an extensive renovation, the Palace of San Telmo became the residence for the president of Andalusia. The Presidency is one of three political components comprising the Junta de Andalucía, the government of this Autonomous Community. The other two branches are the Parliament of Andalusia and the Governing Council.

Av. Roma, s/n, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
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23 Entrance of San Telmo Palace in María Luisa Park in Seville, Spain

The entrance of San Telmo Palace deserves inspection. This spectacular portal was created by the son and grandson of the building’s main architect, Leonardo De Figueroa. He died 24 years before this entry was finished in 1754. The upper balcony is flanked by twelve female sculptures and two atlantes (supporting columns shaped as a man). This flamboyant, ornamental style is called Churrigueresque, named after architect José Benito de Churriguera. He perfected this form of Spanish Baroque architecture during the early 18th century.

Av. Roma, s/n, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
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24 Antigua Estación de Sevilla in Seville, Spain

The bi-plane is suspended in front of the ornate, stained-glass windows of the old Estación de Sevilla. This was a major train station from 1901 until 1990. After remodeling, it became a low-key retail center. Alternatively called Plaza de Armas Station, it should not be confused with the nearby bus station of the same name. Estación de Autobuses at Plaza de Armas opened in 1992. Of the two bus terminals serving Seville, this one is the closest to the major attractions in Casco Antiguo (Old Town).

Plaza la Legión, 2, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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25 Plaza de Armas Mural on Main Bus Station in Seville, Spain

Estación de Autobuses is near the Christ of the Expiration Bridge (Puente Cristo de la Expiración). On the side of the main bus station at Plaza de Armas is this giant mural. The dominate feature is a sleeping youngster painted by Raul Ruiz. This artist from Granada, Spain goes by the street name El Niño. This means The Child. The balance of the wall, decorated by numerous artists, is a kaleidoscope of images such as a watchful angel with a devilish grin.

Plaza de Armas, Calle Arjona, s/n, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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26 Fountain of Híspalis in Seville, Spain

The name of Puerta de Jerez is derived from when this square was a Roman gate leading into Sevilla from the town of Jerez de la Frontera. The plaza’s focal point is the Fountain of Híspalis. Similar to the adjacent Alfonso XIII Hotel, the Fountain of Seville was built to delight visitors attending the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. The statues of the woman and children by sculptor Manuel Delgado Brackenbury are allegories. They represent the historical city when the Romans called it Híspalis.

Puerta de Jerez, 4, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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27 House of Pilate in Seville, Spain

This marble gate designed by Antonio de Aprile led into Palacio de San Andrés when it was built as the opulent residence for Pedro Enríquez de Quiñones in 1529. He was the Adelantado Mayor of Andalusia. This powerful title granted by the king was equivalent to being a governor. The palace is now Casa de Pilatos. In keeping with the Pontius Pilate theme, the rooms are named after events during the last days of Christ. In the center is a mosaic courtyard with a fountain surrounded by a two-tier arcade. House of Pilate is the home of the Dukes of Medinaceli, a title of nobility dating back to 1479.

Pl. de Pilatos, 1, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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28 Our Lady of the Holy Rosary at Basilica of Macarena in Seville, Spain

The façade of the Basilica of Macarena – designed by Aurelio Gómez Millán and finished in 1946 – is unassuming. Looks are deceiving. Step inside to see the side chapels showing key events in Christ’s life. This is Our Lady of the Holy Rosary, carved in the 18th century by Pedro Duque Carnejo. Attached to the basilica is the Museum and Treasure of La Macarena containing more religious items and matador attire.

Calle Bécquer, 1-3, 41002 Sevilla, Spain
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29 Virgin of Hope at Basilica of Macarena in Seville, Spain

Basilica of Macarena’s precious possession is Virgen de la Esperanza de Macarena de Sevilla. The wooden image of the Virgin Mary sculpted by Pedro Roldán displays teardrops streaming down her stained face representing sorrow over Christ’s crucifixion. The 17th century, religious icon wears five emerald brooches gifted by José Gómez Ortega, a famous Spanish matador. The Virgin of Hope of Macarena is the patroness of bullfighters. This Marian image received a canonical coronation in 1964 authorized by Pope John XXIII. The Virgin of Hope is surrounded by a golden altar created by Rafel Fernández del Torro.

Calle Bécquer, 1-3, 41002 Sevilla, Spain
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30 Ancient City Walls in La Macarena in Seville, Spain

Next to the Basilica of Macarena is the ochre-colored Puerta de la Macarena built on command of Sultan Ali ibn Yusuf during the 1100s. From this Macarena Gate stretching east to the Córdoba Gate are remnants of the old city walls. The Murallas de Sevilla were first built by the Romans in the 1st century BC and then modified by others who conquered the city. This defense was called Bab-al-Makrin when built by the Almohads during the 12th century.

Calle Macarena, 12, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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31 Brotherhood of Hope Macarena in La Macarena in Seville, Spain

Brotherhood of Hope Macarena is a Catholic order founded in 1595. Between 1653 and 1949, they resided in this 13th century Church of San Gil near the Arch of La Macarena. Since then, Hermandad de la Macarena has been associated with the Basilica of Macarena. Despite all of the charitable work performed by the 13,000 brothers in Seville, they are best known for their role in the processions during Holy Week. Crowds of thousands attend the festival called Semana Santa de Sevilla to watch elaborate floats carrying religious icons plus costumed performers acting out the persecution of Christ. The highlight is El Silenco on Good Friday, a parade that began in 1340.

Calle San Luis, 125, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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32 Church of Omnium Sanctorum in La Macarena in Seville, Spain

After Ferdinand III conquered Seville in December of 1248 as part of the Spanish Reconquista, he encouraged the rapid construction of Catholic churches. The following year, Iglesia de Omnium Sanctorum was one the first to be built. The side portal shows how this medieval building reflects architectural features of both cultures – Gothic for Christianity and Mudéjar for Muslim.

Calle Peris Mencheta, 2, 41002 Sevilla, Spain
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33 Hospital of Five Wounds in La Macarena in Seville, Spain

The Hospital of Five Wounds was established outside of the city walls in 1500. The name is a reference to the wounds received by Christ during His crucifixion. Less than 50 years later, Don Fadrique Enriquez of Ribera, 1st Marquis of Tarifa, was the benefactor for constructing a large, Andalusian Mannerism building to house the facility in La Macarena neighborhood. Hospital de las Cinco Llagas vacated the property in the 1960s. After an extensive renovation, this became the headquarters for the Andalusian Parliament in 1992.

Calle San Juan de Ribera, 41009 Sevilla, Spain
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34 Tower of the Perdigones in La Macarena in Seville, Spain

Tower of the Perdigones is a remnant of San Francisco de Paula, a manufacturer of munitions plus lead pellets and products. Their smelting factory was built in 1890. There is now an observation deck on top of the 148 foot Torre de los Perdigones. This vantage point provides spectacular views. To the west you will see Puente la Barqueta crossing the Guadalquivir River towards Cartuja Island. In the east is the historic La Macarena. This neighborhood also inspired Los del Rio to write the dance song “Macarena.”

Calle Resolana, 37, 41002 Sevilla, Spain

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35 Mercadona Supermarket in Seville, Spain

People often ask me for hotel recommendations in a city they are planning to visit. My answer is typically none. I prefer renting an apartment. They are cheaper, have more space and at least a partial kitchen. After checking in, I check out the local food markets. My preference is to go where the locals go. In Seville, an excellent choice is Mercadona. They have 69 grocery stores in the province and 20 within the city. This is their newest supermarket located at Plaza de Armas.

Calle San Laureano, s/n, 41002 Sevilla, Spain
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36 Metropol Parasol in Seville, Spain

The most curious structure in Seville was built at La Encarnación Square in 2011. Architect Jürgen Mayer named his creation Metropol Parasol. The locals call it Las Setas de la Encarnación meaning Incarnation’s Mushroom. The world’s largest wooden structure measures 490 by 230 feet and 85 feet tall. In the basement are Roman and Moor artifacts. Surrounding the street level are restaurants and shops. The other two levels host staged performances, a restaurant and an observation deck. This oddity is worth seeing.

Pl. de la Encarnación, s/n, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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37 Museum of Fine Arts of Seville, Spain

Saint Pedro Nolasco formed the Mercedarians in 1218. This was a religious order of friars and nobleman who ransomed captive Christians from the Moors during the Reconquista. About 70,000 were rescued. He also established the Order of the Merced Calzada de la Asunción in Seville. This was their convent built in 1594. For two years starting in 1835, this and other Spanish monasteries were seized during La Desamortización. The spoils from religious properties in Seville were the foundation for Museo de Bellas Artes in 1839. The Museum of Fine Arts showcases painters and sculptors from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The special focus is on works created during the Sevillian Golden Age in the 17th century.

Pl. del Museo, 9, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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38 Pedro Roldán Building at Plaza del Pan in Seville, Spain

It is easy to hustle through Seville squares and be oblivious to their history. This plaza is a great example. Beginning in the 13th century, it was filled with stalls selling bread and pastries. Plaza del Pan (Bread Square) eventually became the center for the Bakers Guild. They were evicted in 1820 in favor of an urban development project. From 1868 until 1971, it was called Commerce Square. Now its official name is Plaza of Jesus of the Passion. But Spanish legacies die hard. The locals still call it Plaza del Pan. The visual highlight is the Pedro Roldán Building. Architect José Espiau y Muñoz crafted his version of Regionalist architecture in 1925 featuring blue ceramic tiles on the façade and dome.

Calle Siete Revueltas, 24, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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39 Salvador Church in Seville, Spain

In 879 AD, a large mosque named Ibn Adabbas was built on this site in today’s Plaza del Salvador. Most of the Muslims place of worship was replaced by Salvador Church beginning in the late 17th century and finished in 1712. You would never guess by looking at the front façade that Colegial del Salvador is Seville’s second largest church. During a restoration in 2008, the level below the foundation was excavated. The digging revealed artifacts from both Arabic and Roman occupations.

Pl. del Salvador, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
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40 Church of San Pedro in Seville, Spain

This was a minaret for an Islamic mosque when it was constructed in 1379. In 1597, an octagonal spire was added to convert it into the Mudéjar bell tower of San Pedro Church. At the time, it was Sevilla’s second tallest tower. Fifteen years later, Vermondo Resta created an elaborate white façade for Iglesia de San Pedro. St. Peter’s Church is the seat of the Brotherhood of the Holy Christ of Burgos.

Plaza de San Pedro, 1624, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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41 Santa Catalina Church in Seville, Spain

Santa Catalina Church and its rear bell tower were built on an existing mosque during the 14th century. Similar to many medieval churches in Seville, it has been declared a Spanish Property of Cultural Interest. The façade features a simple yet elegant rose window and tympanum. This Gothic entrance once fronted the Church of Santa Lucía. In 1929, it was retrofit onto Santa Catalina Church over a Mudéjar-style portal.

Calle Alhondiga, 6, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
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42 Torre del Oro Along Guadalquivir River in Seville, Spain

In 1220, Abu Eola, the governor of the occupying al-Andalus, ordered the construction of this watchtower as part of the city walls. To further protect Sevilla from invasion, a chain was stretched across the Guadalquivir River to La Torre del Oro, thus blocking entry by enemy ships. Since 1936, the Tower of Gold has been Museo Naval. The museum has a modest collection of maritime items ranging from the Spanish navigators to military and industrial shipping.

Paseo de Cristóbal Colón, s/n, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
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