Savannah, Georgia

Savannah offers an abundance of southern grace surrounded by historic architecture facing 22 city squares. There are countless reasons why the state’s oldest city is nicknamed is “The Hostess City of the South.”

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Fountain at Forsyth Park in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

1 Fountain at Forsyth Park in Savannah, Georgia

This fountain is the beautiful centerpiece of the Forsyth Park in Savannah’s historic district. Above the four tritons is a robed woman carrying a staff. The greenspace was inspired by the French when it was designed in the 1840s and then expanded in 1858. The park’s namesake is John Forsyth. He began his distinguished political career in 1813 as a member of the U. S. House of Representatives. Later he was a U. S. Senator from Georgia, the state’s 33rd governor and the U. S. Secretary of State. Forsyth also donated 20 acres of land for the park.

Drayton St & E Hall St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Confederate Memorial at Forsyth Park in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

2 Confederate Memorial at Forsyth Park in Savannah, Georgia

Over 250,000 Confederate soldiers died during the American Civil War. This casualty count does not include civilians or salves. In 1875, the Confederate Memorial was erected in Forsyth Park. The sandstone base features a relief of a grieving widow created by David Reid. The Confederate soldier on top was added in 1879. The bronze sculpture is the work of David Richards. Framing the photo is Spanish moss from a southern live oak tree. The quercus virginiana is the official tree of Georgia.

Drayton St & E Hall St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Ornamental Ironwork of Architecture in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

3 Ornamental Ironwork of Architecture in Savannah, Georgia

If you like architecture, you will love Savannah. There are over 1,000 buildings in the city with historic importance dating to the 18th and 19th centuries. You will enjoy seeing numerous styles including Georgian, Greek Revival, Italianate and Second French Empire. Equally charming is the abundance of ornamental ironwork on the well-preserved homes and public buildings.

423 Bull St Savannah, GA 31401
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Mercer-Williams House Museum in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

4 Mercer-Williams House Museum in Savannah, Georgia

This mansion was commissioned in 1860 by Hugh W. Mercer. He was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. His military career was inspired by his grandfather who was a general during the American Revolution. The home was restored in the early 1970s by James Arthur Williams. He achieved notoriety over the shooting death of his assistant in this house in 1981. After four trials, Williams was acquitted. The estate is now the Mercer-Williams House Museum. Inside you can tour a collection of antique furniture and art.

429 Bull St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Green-Meldrim Mansion Was Sherman’s Headquarters in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

5 Green-Meldrim Mansion Was Sherman’s Headquarters in Savannah, Georgia

Architect John S. Norris designed this Gothic Revival mansion for Charles Green. The cotton merchant’s home was finished in 1861. For a few months in 1864 and 1865, Green lent his home to General William Sherman while his Union troops crushed the Confederates in Georgia and the Carolinas. These victories hastened the end of the Civil War in 1865. In 1892, the residence was purchased by Judge Peter Meldrim. This U. S. National Historic Landmark is available for tours.

14 W Macon St, Savannah, GA 13401
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Inside the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

6 Inside the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Savannah, Georgia

The exterior of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist has a lovely French Gothic design by architect Ephraim Baldwin. When you see the grand twin spires added in 1896, you have high expectations for the interior. You will not be disappointed. Adorning the walls are stained-glass windows from Innsbruck, Austria. At the end of the ornate nave is the high altar below a ribbed apse filled with murals and groin arches.

222 E Harris St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Pirates’ House in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

7 Pirates’ House in Savannah, Georgia

In 1733, James Edward Oglethorpe – a member of England’s Parliament – founded the Georgia Colony and Savannah as a workplace for prisoners released from British debtor prisons. His Oglethorpe Plan included establishing a botanical garden. The following year, the Herb House was built for the chief gardener. In 1754, the wooden building was converted into the Pirate’s House. The tavern soon gained the bad reputation of having drunken sailors dragged through a tunnel by ship captains to work as crewmembers. Enjoy a dinner and drink here while learning more legends of Georgia’s oldest structure.

20 E Broad St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Savannah Cotton Exchange in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

8 Savannah Cotton Exchange in Savannah, Georgia

During the late 1800s, Georgia was the biggest producer of cotton. To accommodate Savannah’s major role in the industry, this Cotton Exchange was designed by architect William Preston and opened in 1886. The façade behind the lion fountain features red brick and terra cotta. Cotton production was devastated in the early 1900s when the crop became invested with boll weevils. The building now serves as headquarters for the Savannah Chamber of Commerce.

100 E Bay St, Savannah, GA 31401
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United States Custom House in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

9 United States Custom House in Savannah, Georgia

When this United States Custom House was finished in 1852, it was third building to have that role since the first one opened in 1789. This custom house also served as a post office and federal courthouse. The Greek Revival façade was designed by John S. Norris. He was a prolific architect in the city during the mid-1800s. Norris is credited with over a dozen Savannah landmarks. From 1861 until 1864, this historic structure was under Confederate control during the Civil War. Look closely at the top of the six enormous columns. You will see the capitals are etched with a tobacco leaf design.

1 E Bay St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Savannah City Hall in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

10 Savannah City Hall in Savannah, Georgia

Perched atop Yamacraw Bluff is the Savannah City Hall. The Renaissance Revival architecture designed by Hyman Wallace Witcover opened in 1906. Your eye travels up the granite and limestone façade, pass the Ionic columns to the statues symbolizing art and commerce. Above the clock is the 70 foot, gilded dome. Then the structure is crowned with a cupola.

2 E Bay St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Telfair Art Museum in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

11 Telfair Art Museum in Savannah, Georgia

Edward Telfair emigrated from Scotland in 1758 to Virginia before settling in the Province of Georgia. He and his brother William became wealthy operating a plantation and mercantile company. His grandson, Alexander Telfair, asked architect William Jay to build this magnificent mansion. It was finished in 1819. Before the last of his daughters died in 1874, Mary Telfair willed the family home to the Georgia Historical Society with the stipulation it become the Telfair Academy of Arts & Sciences. The former Telfair Academy is now an art museum, the oldest in the Southern United States.

121 Barnard St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Haitian Monument in Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

12 Haitian Monument in Savannah, Georgia

In 1779, over 500 soldiers from Haiti joined the colonist to fight against the British invasion during the Siege of Savannah. The men of color were free, not slaves, yet joined to secure the colonies’ independence. The ten companies were called the Chasseurs-Volontaires de Saint-Domingue. The Haitian Monument in Franklin Square is an ensemble of six, life-size bronze soldiers created by sculptor James Mastin. The tribute was finished in 2009.

W Saint Julian St & Montgomery St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Chart House Restaurant in the Historic Warehouse District of Savannah, Georgia - Encircle Photos

13 Chart House Restaurant in the Historic Warehouse District of Savannah, Georgia

Savannah, Georgia’s 22 squares feel like a walk through early America. Equally fun is the Historic Warehouse District. The area serves heaping portions of Southern hospitality, charm and cuisine all day. When the mood lights come on at night, it provides a romantic dinner setting overlooking the Savannah River. An example is the Chart House restaurant. This was a cotton and sugar warehouse when it opened in 1790.

202 W Bay St, Savannah, GA 31401
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Savannah, Georgia Composite of Five Photos - Encircle Photos

Savannah, Georgia Composite of Five Photos

Five photos of Savannah, Georgia are: 1) Statue outside of the Telfair Academy of Arts and Science built in 1819: 2) The Chart House restaurant overlooking the Savannah River built as a cotton and sugar warehouse in 1790; 3) A curved staircase of a Federal style house from the late 18th century; 4) A section of the Confederate Memorial; and 5) The fountain at Forsyth Park.

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