Mainz, Germany

Founded along the Rhine by the Romans during the 1st century B.C., the city has a modern feel because it was largely rebuilt after WWII. There are still several landmarks to explore. Many reflect their occupation by the French.

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1 Christ Church in Mainz, Germany

Until the French occupation in the late 18th century, Protestants were discriminated against by Catholics. But Napoléon Bonaparte declared freedom of religion and, about one hundred years later, the Christuskirche was finished in 1903. The Christ Church’s imposing, 262 foot dome and Renaissance Revival architecture makes it an impressive landmark in Mainz. It was heavily damaged by bombs in 1945 but reconstructed in 1954.

Kaiserstraße 56, 55116 Mainz, Germany
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2 French Occupation of Deutschhaus in Mainz, Germany

During the French Revolution in 1792, the French army occupied Mainz. The Germans tried to declare their independence by announcing the formation of the Republic of Mainz from this balcony, but the French attacked 18 weeks later and imprisoned the republic’s leaders for treason. Two years later, the French seized the Deutschhaus and it was used as a palace by Napoléon Bonaparte.

Peter-Altmeier-Allee 9 55116 Mainz, Germany
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3 Mainz Coat of Arms in Mainz, Germany

In the center of this elaborate door on the Rhine River side of the Deutschhaus are two wheels that each have six spokes and are connected with a cross. This is the coat of arms for the town of Mainz, Germany. It dates back to 780 when this symbol was used by the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz as the powerful leader of the Imperial Diet of the Holy Roman Empire.

Peter-Altmeier-Allee 9 55116 Mainz, Germany
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4 St. Peter’s Church in Mainz, Germany

The Kirch St. Peter is a Roman Catholic church in the old town of Mainz, Germany. It was built in 1762 with a red, baroque façade and two impressive onion domes on its bell towers. After being heavily damaged during WWII, both the outside and the interior were faithfully restored.

Petersstraße 3, 55116 Mainz, Germany
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5 Rhineland-Palatinate Landtag in Mainz, Germany

The 18th century Deutschhaus building was heavily bombed by Allied forces in 1945. After the war, the Rhineland-Palatinate Landtag, which is the parliamentary group for the federal state, decided to reconstruct the former palace. Since it reopened in 1951, the Landtag’s 101 members have met in this building.

Peter-Altmeier-Allee 1, 55116 Mainz, Germany
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6 Teutonic Knight Statue in Mainz, Germany

When Count Francis Louis of Newburg had the Deutschhaus Mainz built as a second residence in 1740, he was also the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights which was a German military order during the Middle Ages. This statue of a knight is a tribute to his role as the Hochmeister. This Teutonic Order stated in 1190 and still exists today as a religious order among Roman Catholics.

Peter-Altmeier-Allee 1, 55116 Mainz, Germany
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7 Two Men Sculpture by Stephan Balkenhol in Mainz, Germany

Stephan Balkenhol is a German sculptor whose wooden carvings typically depict stylized people in interesting poses. This outdoor statue of acrobats is called “Two Men” and was created in 2001. The artwork is located at the corporate headquarters of Westdeutsche Immobilien Servicing AG. WestImmo specializes in financing for commercial real estate.

Große Bleiche 46, 55116 Mainz, Germany
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