Indiana

Encircle Indiana: The capital city of the Hoosier State is Indianapolis, home of the Indianapolis 500 and the Colts. To the north and south of the state house in “The Crossroads of America” are Crawfordsville and Columbus. Both are worth exploring during your road trip through the Midwest.

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1 Robert N. Stewart Second Street Bridge in Columbus, Indiana

This cable-stayed Second Street Bridge is a beautiful gateway to Columbus, Indiana. It is also a perfect picture frame for the Bartholomew County Courthouse in the background. In 2013, the span was renamed the Robert N. Stewart bridge in honor of a former city mayor. Columbus is often called the “Athens of the Prairie.” The city is a charming blend of historic buildings, modern architecture, outdoor art and lush parks. For a very special treat, visit Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor and marvel at all of the old soda fountains while slurping on a chocolate malt with whip cream and a cherry on top.

Robert N. Stewart Bridge State Rd 46, Columbus IN 47201
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2 Indiana State Capitol Building in Indianapolis, Indiana

The current Indiana State Capitol building, also referred to as a state house, is the fifth since Indiana became the 19th state on December 11, 1816. The four-story, Greek Revival building in Indianapolis is in the shape of a cross and constructed from local limestone and oak. It was finished under budget in 1888. By then, the term “Hoosier” had been around for more than fifty years. State historians theorize the term came from the practice of country folk shouting “Who’s here” when an unidentified person approached their frontier cabin. Hoosier then evolved into a derogatory label before becoming a common name for an Indiana resident around 1830.

200 W Washington St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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3 Indiana State Capitol Rotunda Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana

105 feet above the rotunda floor at the Indiana State Capitol in Indianapolis is this 72 foot inner dome with delightful blue tones. The exquisite stained glass shines brightly regardless of the weather thanks to a 1988 restoration when lighting and reflective paint were added to the inner dome above the glass.

200 W Washington St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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4 Indiana State Capitol Building Dome Silhouette at Sunset in Indianapolis, Indiana

It is impossible to photograph the entire front, eastern side of the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis because buildings block the view at the end of Market Street. However, while trying to accomplish the impossible, I stumbled on this shot of the capitol at sunset from the base of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Monument Circle. I later discovered the best way to photograph the eastern side of the state house is from the Embassy Suites parking lot.

1861 Monument Cir, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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5 Pro Patria Statue by Henry Hering at Indiana World War Memorial in Indianapolis, Indiana

This exquisite, 24 foot bronze sculpture called Pro Patria by Henry Hering has adorned the World War Memorial in Indianapolis since 1929. The young man encircled by the American flag is a tribute to the soldiers who served in WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam. In the background are Ionic columns of the Neo-classical monument that resembles Greek architecture. Inside are three floors of exhibits.

55 E Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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6 Serviceman Plays Tuba at Indiana World War Memorial in Indianapolis, Indiana

The United States National POW/MIA Recognition Day was created in 1979. The event is observed on the third Friday in September. It was designed to never forget those who went missing while serving their country, including the 1,741 from the Vietnam War. This serviceman was part of the ceremony on September 20, 2013, at the Indiana World War Memorial in Indianapolis.

55 E Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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7 Orcas Passage Mural by Wyland in Indianapolis, Indiana

Wyland and his foundation spent 27 years completing the global project of 100, life-size wall murals of marine animals and aquatic life. Number 74 is called “Orcas Passage.” The painting is on the Indianapolis Public Schools building in Indianapolis, Indiana. This is a detail of the 153 foot by 35 foot mural.

120 E Walnut St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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8 Jacks Mural by Will Schlough in Indianapolis, Indiana

In an alley parking lot behind the Indianapolis – Marion County Public Library is an untitled wall mural of gigantic playing jacks by Pittsburg artist Will Schlough. They were brightly painted on sheet metal and then bolted to the building wall. The art was sponsored by 46 for XLVI, a mural program of the Arts Council of Indianapolis designed to create 46 outdoor paintings by 35 artists.

923 N Meridian St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
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9 Indianapolis Motor Speedway Logo in Indianapolis, Indiana

This Wing and Wheel was the trademark symbol for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway from the 1970’s until 2008. The logo still adorns the entrance of the Racing Hall of Fame. This is a 30,000 square-foot museum that tells the story of the raceway from its troubled start in 1909 until the present. The museum displays over 75 cars. 30 of the autos won the Indy 500.

4790 W 16th St, Indianapolis, IN 46222
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10 Ben Hur Author General Lew Wallace’s Study in Crawfordsville, Indiana

This red brick, copper domed study was built in 1898 by General Lew Wallace, the author of “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ.” Four limestone friezes display carvings by Bohemian Bohumir Kryl of characters from two Wallace novels. They are Princess Irene and the Prince of India plus Judah Ben-Hur and his sister Tirzah. Inside is the General’s 1,200 book library, his original furniture plus artifacts from his military career and inventions. Wallace is quoted as saying, “I’d rather write another book than be rich.”

General Lew Wallace Study & Museum 200 Wallace Ave, Crawfordsville IN 47933
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11 Old Man Bust at General Lew Wallace’s Study in Crawfordsville, Indiana

Lewis “Lew” Wallace was a general and hero during the Civil War. He is also famous for negotiating a potential pardon for Billy the Kid and for writing “Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ” in 1880, the 19th century’s best-selling book. Years later, he had a writing study built at his mansion in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Inside are four busts depicting charters from his novels, including this one of the Prince from “The Prince of India.” The plaster bust was carved by Englishman H.R. Saunders.

General Lew Wallace Study & Museum 200 Wallace Ave, Crawfordsville IN 47933
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