Encircle Rome – One

Encircle Rome – One showcases places to see north and west of the Colosseum. They are arranged in a walking path. Highlights include the Pantheon, Trevi Fountain and Spanish Steps. Encircle Rome – One ends at the Tiber River and the start of the Vatican Walk. Alternatively, a short distance away is the beginning of the Borghese & Pincio Gardens Walk.

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1 Piazza del Quirinale on Quirinal Hill in Rome, Italy

Quirinal Hill is the highest of the Seven Hills of Rome. Archeological evidence suggests the Sabines lived here during the 8th and 7th centuries BC. This coincides with when Romulus was the founder and first king of Rome. For over two millenniums, this has been the scene of temples, a Roman bath, a convent plus estates of wealthy and papal families. Today, the epicenter is Piazza del Quirinale. Flanking the square are the presidential palace (Palazzo del Quirinale) and, seen here, Italy’s Constitutional Court (Palazzo della Consulta). On the right are marble sculptures named the “Horse Tamers.” They date from the 4th century. Towering 48 feet above them is an ancient Roman obelisk uncovered in 1527 and installed in 1786.

Piazza del Quirinale, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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2 Palazzo della Consulta at Piazza del Quirinale in Rome, Italy

Palazzo della Consulta was commissioned by Pope Clement XII, designed by Ferdinando Fuga and finished in 1735. Until 1870, it housed Sacra Consulta. The Pontifical Court was the equivalent of a supreme court. Later occupants were: the ruling Triumvirate during the Roman Republic; the residence of Prince Umberto before becoming King of Italy in 1878; the Ministry of Foreign Affairs; followed by the Ministry of Colonies. Since 1955, Palazzo della Consulta has been the courthouse for the Constitutional Court of Italy. The panel of 15 judges hear cases on constitutional matters, powers of the Italian Republic and judicial issues regarding the country’s president.

Piazza del Quirinale, 41, 00187 Rome RM, Italy
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3 Corsini Coat of Arms on Palazzo della Consulta in Rome, Italy

Many of the landmark buildings in Rome bear sculptural, self-serving praise for the original owners. Palazzo della Consulta is a great example. At the top are two trumpeting angels representing Fame. They flank the Corsini family coat of arms. This Florentine dynasty began in the late 12th century. For the next 800 years, they produced a long list of powerful and wealthy business owners, politicians and religious leaders. Above the heraldic shield are the papal symbols of a triple crown and the keys of Simon and Peter. These signify Clemente XII, a member of the Corsini family, pope from 1730 to 1740, and the client for building Palazzo della Consulta.

Piazza del Quirinale, 41, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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4 Justice and Religion Allegories on Palazzo della Consulta in Rome, Italy

As your eye travels down the façade of Palazzo della Consulta, you will see another marble ensemble. These allegories created by Filippo della Valle represent Justice and Religion. They reflect the building’s original purpose: to house the Sacra Congregazione della Consulta. The judicial body consisting of five cardinals were the ultimate courthouse on feudal, municipal, city and state issues.

Piazza del Quirinale, 41, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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5 Quirinal Palace at Piazza del Quirinale in Rome, Italy

You are now standing in front of the ninth largest palace in the world. Palazzo del Quirinale contains nearly 1.2 million square feet of space across 1,200 rooms! Since its completion in 1583, it has been the residence of thirty popes, four kings and a dozen presidents. Today, Quirinal Palace is one of three homes of the Italian Republic presidents. You will definitely want to tour the lavishly appointed rooms, halls and apartments. Then wander through the ten acre gardens featuring blooming plants, fountains and sculptures. But plan ahead. Tickets must be reserved at least five days in advance.

From here, the Encircle Rome – One tour heads west. If you want to connect with the start of Encircle Rome – Two, then walk two blocks north along Via del Quirinale.

Piazza del Quirinale, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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6 Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, Italy

Saint Ignatius of Loyola is best known as the co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) in 1539. A dozen years later, he also established the Roman College. This evolved into the Pontifical Gregorian University. Gregoriana now educates about 3,800 students. Most of them are priests or seminarians. Since 1930, classes have been conducted inside of Palazzo Gabrielli-Borromeo.

Piazza della Pilotta, 4, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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7 Church of St. Marcellus at the Corso in Rome, Italy

Christians were severely persecuted in Rome beginning in 64 AD. One of the harshest periods – marked by property confiscation, incarcerations and executions – was during the reign of Diocletian from 284 until 305. In this time frame, practicing Christians worshipped in private homes called a titulus while other people disavowed their beliefs out of fear. When Constantine the Great became emperor in 306, he stopped the persecution. In 313, he passed the Edict of Milan providing religious tolerance. It was in this setting that Pope Marcellus was elected in 308. Although his papacy was short, he brought order back into the religion and established 25 parishes in Rome. Then he was arrested and died in captivity. The Church of St. Marcellus at the Corso was built in his name during the late 4th century and houses his remains. The structure has been destroyed, rebuilt and restored several times. The current version dates from the 16th and 17th centuries. This marble high altar was created by Sebastiano Cipriano in 1725. San Marcello al Corso is managed by the Servite Friars.

Piazza di San Marcello, 5, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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8 Courtyard of Doria Pamphilj Gallery in Rome, Italy

The noble house of Doria-Pamphili was a princely lineage founded in 1610 and dissolved in 2000. One of their several palaces was Palazzo Doria Pamphilj. This opulent mansion was built in 1651. Hanging inside its lavish staterooms is one of Italy’s largest private collections of art masterpieces. You can also marvel at the apartments of the former princesses and princes plus the family chapel.

Via del Corso, 305, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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9 Church of the Gesù at Piazza Del Gesu in Rome, Italy

In 1539, Ignatius of Loyola co-founded the Society of Jesus. The Catholic order is commonly called the Jesuits. He spent the last 17 years of his life at this location. Touring his office is fascinating. Upon his death in 1556, he was interred in Maria della Strada Church. After the structure was replaced by the existing Church of the Gesù in 1580, his body was transferred to a bronze urn inside the marvelous St. Ignatius Chapel. The Jesuits were politically suppressed by many European countries and their New World colonies during the second half of the 18th century. Pope Clement XIV officially dissolved the order in 1773. In 1814, their previous status was restored by Pope Pius VII. Since then, Chiesa del Gesù has been the mother church of the Society of Jesus.

Piazza del Gesù, 54, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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10 Elephant and Obelisk at Piazza della Minerva in Rome, Italy

At the southeast corner of the Pantheon is a square named Piazza della Minerva. Here you will find the smallest of the dozen obelisks in Rome. The ancient Egyptian artifact measures just under 18 feet tall. Of equal interest is the marble sculpture of an elephant created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini and installed in 1667. Bernini was one of the most gifted and prolific Italian sculptors during the 17th century.

Piazza della Minerva, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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11 Exterior of Pantheon in Rome, Italy

The best maintained Roman temple from antiquity is the Pantheon. It stands on the site where, according to legend, Rome’s founder Romulus was called into heaven by Mars, the god of war. The Greek word pantheon means “honor all gods.” The first version was built for Marcus Agrippa in 27 BC. After being destroyed by fire in 80 AD, Emperor Domitian had it rebuilt. Lightning claimed most of the structure three decades later. The current version was commissioned by Emperor Hadrian and finished in 126 AD. Notice the 16 Corinthian columns supporting the portico. They measure 39 feet tall, five feet wide and weigh 60 tons each. Most impressive is the gray granite imported from an Egyptian quarry.

Piazza della Rotonda, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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12 Interior of Pantheon in Rome, Italy

The cylindrical interior of the Pantheon is beyond magnificent! Above your head is the world’s largest unsupported dome weighing 5,000 tons. The concrete dome’s diameter is 142 feet and so is the distance from the marble floor to the oculus at the apex. The windowless hole in the ceiling measures 25.6 feet across. This is the only source of light in the Pantheon. The dome is decorated with five rows of 28 coffers (sunken panels).

Piazza della Rotonda, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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13 Semi-dome above Altar of Pantheon in Rome, Italy

The Pantheon was a pagan temple until 609. In May of that year, it was converted into a Catholic church by Pope Boniface IV. It is called the Church of St. Mary of the Martyrs (Chiesa Santa Maria dei Martiri). The name is often shortened to Santa Maria Rotonda. 1,100 years would pass before the current high altar and this semi-dome crowning it were ordered by Pope Clement XI. They were created by papal architect Alessandro Specchi in the early 18th century. The rest of the Pantheon’s first floor is encircled with marble, columns and niches containing statues of saints. You might also want to watch for the sarcophagus of Raphael, one of Italy’s great master painters during the High Renaissance period.

Piazza della Rotonda, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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14 Fountain of the Pantheon at Piazza della Rotonda in Rome, Italy

The Pantheon faces Piazza della Rotonda. The square is accented with the Fountain of the Pantheon. The fountain was created in 1575 at the bequest of Pope Gregory XIII. It was significantly modified in 1711. Sculptor Vincenzo Filippi created the marble dolphins and four grotesque masks at the base. In the center of Fontana del Pantheon is the 21 foot Macuteo Obelisk. It was uncovered at the Temple of Ra in Heliopolis near Cairo, Egypt. The obelisk dates back to the 12th century BC.

Piazza della Rotonda, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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15 Church of Saint Mary Magdalene in Rome, Italy

A rarely visited architectural treasure a short distance from the Pantheon is Santa Maria Maddalena. The Rococo style, concave façade is spectacular. After 70 years of construction, the Catholic church dedicated to Mary Magdalene was consecrated in 1699. The Late Baroque exterior was finished in 1735. The interior is also visually exciting featuring plenty of marble columns and vibrant frescos.

Piazza della Maddalena, 53, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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16 Italian Senate in Palazzo Madama in Rome, Italy

The House of Medici was an Italian dynasty with a long lineage of wealthy bankers, politicians and religious leaders from 1230 until 1743. In the late 15th century, they commissioned Madama Palace. Two of its famous family residents became Popes Leo X and Clement VII. The current façade was added in the mid-17th century. The mansion later became the seat of the Papal Government. In 1871, the newly established Kingdom of Italy converted Palazzo Madama into the Senato del Regno. In 1947, the legislative body became the current Senate of the Republic.

Piazza Madama, 11, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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17 Fountain of the Four Rivers at Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy

Piazza Navona was the site of the Stadium of Domitian (Circus Agonalis) dating back to 86 AD. The square’s current rectangular shape was created in the late 15th century. The public space is graced with three fountains. On the north and south end respectively are the Fountain of Neptune (1574) and the Moor Fountain (1575). In the center is Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (Fountain of the Four Rivers) created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1651. The four allegorical sculptures represent the Nile in Egypt, the Danube in Europe, the Rio de la Plata in South America and the Ganges in India and Bangladesh. This detail is the river god Ganges.

Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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18 Egyptian Obelisk at Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy

Rising high above the Fountain of the Four Rivers is an Egyptian obelisk. The Aswan granite is engraved with hieroglyphs. It was one of four obelisks discovered at the Temple of Isis and Serapis in Rome dating back to the 2nd century BC. In the early 4th century, Emperor Maxentius moved the archeological discovery to the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way (Via Appia) leading to the Roman Forum. In the mid-17th century, Pope Innocent X had the obelisk erected in Piazza Navona to symbolize his papal powers. The pope’s former family residence, Palazzo Pamphilj, is also located at Piazza Navona. It is now the Brazilian Embassy.

Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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19 Sant’Agnese in Agone on Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy

When Giambattista Pamphilj became Pope Innocent X in 1644, he commissioned an incredible mansion named Palazzo Pamphilj be built on Piazza Navona. Of course, such a powerful family needed their own attached chapel. He also wanted an impressive mausoleum. These reasons were the impetus for building Sant’Agnese in Agone beginning in 1651. It was consecrated in 1672. The Baroque façade features twin bell towers. They flank the central dome and cupola. The first level is accented with columns and pilasters with Corinthian capitals.

Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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20 High Altar of Sant’Agnese in Agone on Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy

There is plenty to admire in Sant’Agnese in Agone. The Catholic church has four elaborate chapels and four side altars. Each is dedicated to a different saint. This is the main altar. The white marble relief sculpted by Domenico Guidi in 1688 portrays the Holy Family with the Saints Elizabeth, John and Zacharia. The gorgeous artwork is framed by green antico marble columns. Notice the angel sculptures in the broken pediment. In the middle is a dove symbolizing the martyrdom of the church’s namesake. Saint Agnes was beheaded at the age of 12 in 304 AD. The scene of her execution was a few steps away at the Stadium of Domitian. The former arena is now Piazza Navona. The virgin saint is entombed in a crypt within the church.

Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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21 Dome Interior of Sant’Agnese in Agone on Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy

You might get a stiff neck admiring the dome inside of Sant’Agnese in Agone. Its design style is called empyrean meaning heaven-like. The fresco is entitled “The Apotheosis of St. Agnes into the Glory of Heaven.” The painting portrays Saint Agnes being welcomed into heaven by a host of angels and saints. Ciro Ferri spent the last 19 years of his life creating this masterpiece. He died in 1689, four years before the project was finished.

Piazza Navona, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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22 Galleria Alberto Sordi in Rome, Italy

Galleria in Piazza Colonna opened in 1922 based on the Art Nouveau design of architect Dario Carbone. The arcade introduced an exciting level of elegance for shoppers. Inside are wide, beautifully appointed concourses that converge in the center. They are decorated with carved chestnut wood and marble flooring. The boutique retailers are located on the first floor with office space on the upper four levels. After an extensive renovation in 2003, the mall was renamed Galleria Alberto Sordi in honor of a famous Italian actor who died the same year.

Piazza Colonna, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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23 Marcus Aurelius Column at Piazza Colonna in Rome, Italy

The centerpiece of Piazza Colonna is a 97 foot, Carrara marble column featuring an intricate spiral relief. The carvings portray the highlights of the Marcomannic Wars. These conflicts from 166 to 180 AD pitted the Roman Empire against the Germans and Sarmatians. Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius was considered the victor, even though he died a few months before the end of the final battle. The Marcus Aurelius Column was erected in 193 AD.

Piazza Colonna, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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24 Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy

The most iconic fountain in Rome and highly acclaimed across the world is the Trevi Fountain. Set against the backdrop of Palazzo Poli, this is the pièce de résistance of Nicola Salvi’s architectural career. Sadly, he died in 1751 after 19 years of work. The project was completed 11 year later. Fontana di Trevi is enormous, measuring 86 feet tall and 161 feet wide. According to tradition, if you throw a coin over your left shoulder in the fountain, you will someday return to Rome. Whether this is true or not, you will be helping to generate $1.5 million annually.

Piazza di Trevi, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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25 Sculptures on Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy

There are three main sculptures on the Trevi Fountain. They are all crafted from Carrara marble. In the center is Oceanus, the mythological personification of the ocean. He is riding in a chariot pulled by two horses and led by Tritons, the Greek messengers of the sea. The statue on the right is an allegory for Health. This statue on the left is Abundance. In her hands is a cornucopia while fresh water flows from a vase at her feet. Four additional statues stand on the columns. They are Abundance of Fruit, Fertility of Crops, Products of Autumn and Joy of Gardens. Crowning the ensemble is the Papal coat of arms.

Piazza di Trevi, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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26 Madonnas at Street Intersections in Rome, Italy

First-time visitors to Rome are typically overwhelmed by the major landmarks representing over two thousand years of history. The keen observer will begin noticing small, religious art perched above the first floor of buildings at intersections. Most portray the Virgin Mary. They are often supported by angel carvings and were once illuminated with oil lamps. These are Madonnelle meaning Little Madonnas. There are over 2,700 of them along Rome’s streets. This one near the Trevi Fountain copies the Madonna dell’Archetto painting by Domenico Maria Muratori. According to legend, the original image of the Virgin Mary moved her eyes during a French invasion of Rome in the late 18th century.

Via del Lavatore, 54, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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27 Saints Vincent and Anastasius at Trevi in Rome, Italy

Across the street from Trevi Fountain is Saints Vincent and Anastasius at Trevi. The former Catholic church was commissioned by Cardinal Mazarin in the mid-17th century. While he was the First Minister of France and regent over the young King Louis XIV (1642 until 1661), he brokered peace across several European countries while expanding France’s power. The cardinal’s coat of arms is supported by two angels below the cherubs with trumpets near the top of the travertine façade. Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio was once the pontifical parish. From 1583 until 1903, the hearts of 22 popes were interred inside. Since 2002, it has been a Bulgarian Orthodox Church.

Vicolo dei Modelli, 72, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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28 Santa Maria in Via in Rome, Italy

In 1256, Cardinal Pietro Capocci discovered an icon of the Blessed Virgin Mary floating in a well behind his house. He and Pope Alexander IV declared the miracle to be a Marian apparition and ordered a chapel to be built on the spot adjacent to an existing church. After the church was rebuilt in 1513, it was gifted to the Servite Order. The Catholic friars and nuns constructed their convent by the end of the 16th century (it was torn down in 1930). Then they finished the rebuilding of Santa Maria in Via in 1681. The two-story façade created by architect Giacomo della Porta is faced with travertine limestone.

Via del Mortaro, 24, 00187 Rome RM, Italy
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29 Column of the Immaculate Conception at Piazza Mignanelli in Rome, Italy

In 1854, Pope Pius IX declared in a papal bull named Ineffabilis Deus that the Blessed Virgin Mary was free of original sin. Every year since the proclamation, Mary’s Immaculate Conception has been celebrated by Catholics on December 8. In 1857, this Column of the Immaculate Conception was erected in Piazza Mignanelli. On top of the 38.7 foot Cipollino marble column is a bronze sculpture of Mary crafted by Giuseppe Obici. Interestingly, the Corinthian column dates from antiquity and was uncovered in 1777. It was originally crowned with a statue of the goddess Minerva. At the base of this Marian monument are sculpted biblical figures of Moses, King David, Osaiah and Seer Ezekiel.

Piazza Mignanelli, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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30 Spanish Steps in Rome, Italy

The Spanish Steps is among the most visited locations in Rome. The 135 steps connect the church of Santissima Trinità dei Monti at the pinnacle with Piazza di Spagna below. The stairwell – the widest in Europe – was named after the nearby Spanish Embassy. French diplomate Étienne Gueffier funded the construction which was finished in 1725. Architect Francesco de Sanctis is credited with the design of Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti. Just off camera to the right is where the famous English poet John Keats died of tuberculous in 1821 at the age of 25. The former apartment is now the Keats–Shelley Memorial House.

Piazza di Spagna, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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31 Sallustiano Obelisk above Spanish Steps in Rome, Italy

Roman Emperor Aurelian (reign 270 to 275 AD) was so impressed with the Flaminio obelisk created for Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II during the 13th century BC, he ordered a replica. It was originally placed in the Gardens of Sallust. In 1789, the Sallustiano Obelisk was moved to the top of the Spanish Steps in Piazza Trinità dei Monti. You might strain your neck while admiring the hieroglyphs. As a footnote, these carvings were created in Rome and not Egypt. The red granite obelisk is 45.6 feet tall yet reaches a height of 100 feet including the pedestal. Locals call this Trinità dei Monti Obelisk because it stands in front of a late 16th century church of the same name.

Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, 3, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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32 Horse-drawn Carriage below Spanish Steps in Rome, Italy

At the base of the Spanish Steps is Piazza di Spagna. Square of Spain is always filled with tourists. Many opt to tour the neighborhood in the shaded comfort of a horse-drawn carriage. You will find several drivers awaiting their next fare around Fontana della Barcaccia. Fountain of the Boat is a half-submerged marble ship sculpted by Pietro Bernini in 1629. It displays the Barberini family papal coat of arms (three bees) in recognition of the project’s benefactor, Pope Urban VIII (formally Maffeo Barberini). The inspiration for the design was a ship that was carried here during a flooding of the Tiber River.

Piazza di Spagna, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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33 Upscale Shopping near Spanish Steps in Rome, Italy

After having fun people watching around the Spanish Steps, get ready for some serious window shopping. Warning: this experience may give your credit card a workout. There are several high-end retailers facing Piazza di Spagna. Plenty more premier brands – such as Gucci, Cartier, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Max Mara – can be found along Via Condotti (shown here). True shopaholics will also explore nearby streets Via Borgognona, Via delle Carrozze and Via Frattina. When your feet get tired and your stomach begins to grumble, select from many fabulous restaurants for a memorable lunch or dinner.

Via dei Condotti, 15, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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34 Most Holy Trinity of the Spaniards Church in Rome, Italy

The Trinitarian Order was founded in 1198 with the mission of freeing Christians held captive by pirates in Europe. This ensemble carved by Pietro Pacilli portrays an angel releasing two chained prisoners. The artwork is above the door of Santissima Trinità degli Spagnoli. The Catholic complex built in the mid-18th century consisted of the Most Holy Trinity of the Spaniards Church plus an adjacent monastery and hospice.

Via dei Condotti, 42, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
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35 Saints Dedication at St. Charles at the Corso in Rome, Italy

The proper name for this Roman Catholic church is Sant’Ambrogio e Carlo al Corso. This describes its dedication to Saints Ambrose and Charles Borromeo. They were bishops in Milan, Italy yet lived about 1,200 years part. Ambrose of Milan (339 – 397) is considered a Doctor of the Church for his staunch defense of religious teachings and his repeated admonishments of the Roman emperor for his offenses. Charles Borromeo (1538 – 1584) was canonized in 1610 for his role in defending the Catholic church during the Protestant Reformation.

Via del Corso, 437, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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36 History of St. Charles at the Corso in Rome, Italy

There is evidence of a previous church here during the 10th century dedicated to Saint Nicholas of Myra. In 1520, another church was established by the pope for a community of stonecutters from northern Italy (Lombardy) while they were working on the Sistine Chapel. They named it Santi Niccolò ed Ambrogio in honor of their patron saint, Ambrose of Milan. Its replacement required 72 years to construct, from 1612 until 1684. Then it was renamed Sant’Ambrogio e Carlo al Corso to recognize both Saints Ambrose and Charles Borromeo.

Via del Corso, 437, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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37 Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome, Italy

Augustus was the first emperor of the Roman Empire from 27 BC to 14 AD. Many historians consider him to be the best emperor. On his deathbed, his last words were, “Have I played the part well? Then applaud as I exit.” His body was cremated and interred inside the Mausoleum of Augustus. He commissioned this massive structure early in his 40 year reign. It measures 295 feet in diameter and 137 feet high. Also buried here are family members, including Emperor Tiberius, the son and successor of Augustus.

Piazza Augusto Imperatore, 5, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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38 Church of San Rocco in Rome, Italy

In the late 15th century, a hospital was founded along the east bank of the Tiber River. The institution was dedicated to Saint Roch, the patron saint of the plague and other diseases. In 1499, Pope Alexander VI commissioned an adjoining chapel. Chiesa di San Rocco was completely rebuilt in 1657 based on the drawings of Giovan Antonio de’ Rossi. The Catholic church’s façade was not completed until 1834. The interior of this Baroque dome is decorated with frescos of angels. The central nave is richly appointed with pink marble accented by religious paintings, sculptures and reliefs.

This ends the Encircle Rome – One guide. But you are only a few steps away from starting the Tiber River to Vatican Walk. Proceed to the nearby bridge called Pointe Cavour and enjoy your stroll.

Alternatively, you can head north on Via di Ripetta to begin the Borghese & Pincio Gardens Walk.

Piazza Augusto Imperatore, 6, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
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