Encircle Buenos Aires, Argentina

Encircling the Microcentro of Buenos Aires are so many neighborhoods with fascinating places to visit. This travel guide suggests some of the best.

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1 Colorful Buildings at Caminito in La Boca, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Welcome to the few blocks that are most visited by tourists in Buenos Aires! Caminito is brimming with artisans plus lively bars and restaurants housed in vibrant buildings. The atmosphere is unique, euphoric and inviting. In the mid-19th century, this was a derelict section of the La Boca neighborhood populated by Italian immigrants. Then, artist Benito Martín began using the decrepit walls of tenement houses as his canvas. This inspired composer Juan de Dios Filiberto to write the famous tango song “Caminito” meaning little alley. The crowds began to come and have grown ever since.

Caminito Street, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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2 Famous Figures at Caminito in La Boca, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Numerous mannequins hang from the windows of the brightly painted buildings in Caminito. They add to the festive mood. Several portray famous Argentine personalities such as these waving on the balcony of Caminito Tango Bar-Café. On the left is the dashing Carlos Gardel. The King of Tango was a celebrated singer and composer before he died in a 1935 plane crash at the pinnacle of his career. In the middle is the revered Eva Perón, the former first lady of Argentina. The country mourned her death at age 33 in 1952. On the right is Diego Maradona. He is considered to be Argentina’s all-time best footballer.

Gral. Gregorio Aráoz de Lamadrid 784, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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3 Tango Dancing at Caminito in La Boca, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Argentinian tango emerged in the 1870s among a melting pot of immigrants around the docks of Buenos Aires. Soon the music and style of dance filled taverns before reaching local theaters. In the early 20th century, tango spread across Europe and America. Like all crazes, the tango lost its popularity. Yet it still flourishes in Buenos Aires and especially along Caminito Street in La Boca. Each bar and restaurant features its own pair of dancers. Even the tourists get into the act.

Caminito Street, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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4 La Boca Riverfront in La Boca, Buenos Aires, Argentina

La Boca means “the mouth” of the Mantanza River (also called Riachuelo). After flowing for 40 miles, the river empties into Río de la Plata. Beginning in the early 17th century, this was a small – frankly inadequate – port named La Vuelta de Rocha. It welcomed thousands of Italian immigrants who began flocking to Buenos Aires in the mid-19th century. About fifty years later, a new port was built and these waters became polluted with industrial waste. A riverwalk has since been built to accommodate tourists visiting neighboring Caminito Street. In the background are two bridges. The black one is Puente Transbordador. It operated from 1914 until 1960. After the National Historic Monument was refurbished, it reopened in 2017. Behind it is the Avellaneda Bridge, built in 1940.

Av. Don Pedro de Mendoza 2103, C1169AAF, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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5 National Historical Museum in San Telmo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

San Telmo is the oldest neighborhood in Buenos Aires. It is also the smallest of the city’s 48 barrios measuring a mere .75 square miles. Among its charming features are cobblestone streets and colonial buildings. A worthwhile attraction is the National Historical Museum. The setting is in this early 19th century mansion once owned by Charles Ridgley Horne. The exhibits trace Argentina’s freedom from Spain. The focal years are 1810 through 1818, beginning with the May Revolution and ending with the Argentine War of Independence. Other displays highlight colonial times and the indigenous people who lived along Río de la Plata prior to the arrival of the Spanish.

Defensa 1600, C1143, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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6 Gazebo at Lezama Park in San Telmo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Adjacent to National Historical Museum is Lezama Park. This was the landing site of conquistador Pedro de Mendoza in 1536. A monument honors the city’s first founder. Several wealthy citizens owned the land until it was purchased in 1852 by José Gregorio Lezama. He invested a fortune converting the 20 acre property into a garden. When the estate was bequeathed to the city in 1894, famed landscape designer Carlos Thays was tasked with adding enhancements. Among them were this gazebo and sculptures. Lezama Park remains an uncrowded gem of San Telmo.

Parque Lezama, Av. Brasil, C1143, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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7 University of Buenos Aires Engineering School in San Telmo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

While Eva Perón was the popular first lady of Argentina (1946 – 1952), her passion was raising donations to support the poor and orphans, provide scholarships for children plus build schools, hospitals and homes. These charitable activities were conducted by the Eva Perón Foundation. This was the headquarters. At its peak, the institution had 14,000 workers. The program was so successful that by 1952 – shortly before her death at 33 – Eva Perón was declared the Spiritual Leader of the Nation. This Neoclassical building is now the Engineering School (Facultad de Ingeniería) of the University of Buenos Aires.

Av. Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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8 Pizzurno Palace in Balvanera, Buenos Aires, Argentina

During your walking tour, you visited a couple landmarks in Balvanera around Plaza del Congreso. There are only a few other places of interest to tourists in this dense, residential neighborhood. Among them are several theaters. Fans of Second French Empire architecture will admire Pizzurno Palace. The 15 acre lot beneath this building was gifted by heiress Petronila Rodríguez de Rojas in 1882. Her estate also provided the funding for a girl’s school and senior living facility. When finished in 1888, it was called Pizzurno Palace. Since then, this elegant structure has housed several government agencies. The current occupant is the Argentine Ministry of Education.

Paraguay 1661, B1754 FOK, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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9 Water Company Palace in Balvanera, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This is the most impressive water treatment building in the world! During the 1870s – a period of high growth for Buenos Aires – the capital city suffered yellow fever because of poor sanitation. The solution? Build a palace. This magnificent, block-long building has beautiful coloring, French Renaissance flair and over 300,000 terracotta tiles created by Royal Doulton. All of this grandeur housed a waterworks system. It is called Palacio de Aguas Corrientes or Water Company Palace. Inside is a small yet fascinating museum.

Riobamba 750, C1025ABP, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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10 José de San Martín Monument in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Retitro is a small barrio (less than 1.75 square miles) and is considered part of Microcrentro. Exploring this neighborhood can easily be added to your walking tour. Simply continue shopping north to the end of Florida Street and you will arrive at Plaza San Martín. This park was the center of slave trade from 1713 until 1813. Then it became a barracks of the Regiment of Mounted Grenadiers led by José de San Martín. El Libertador (The Liberator) is a national hero for winning the freedom of Argentina, Chile and Peru from Spain. A dozen years after his death in 1850, sculptor Louis-Joseph Daumas was commissioned to create this equestrian monument. Surrounding the red granite base are allegories for major moments of the general’s success during the Argentine War of Independence.

General San Martín Plaza, C1059, CABA, Argentina
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11 Weapons Museum at San Martín Plaza in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Defining the southeast corner of San Martín Plaza is an often-overlooked building despite its enormous size. Step inside! This is the Museum of Weapons of the Nation. Museo de Armas de la Nacion has the country’s largest collection of military arms. The 18 exhibition rooms trace the evolution of weaponry from the Middle Ages. The seemingly endless displays are enthralling.

Av. Santa Fe 702, C1059ABO, CABA, Argentina
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12 Círculo Militar at San Martín Plaza in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This ornate door at San Martín Plaza leads to the former mansion of José C. Paz. In 1869, he founded La Prensa. This is still a widely-read daily Argentine newspaper. Flush with financial success, he hired French architect Louis Sortais to design Paz Palace. When completed in 1914, the 65,000 square feet qualified as the largest – and some say most opulent – residence in Argentina. In 1938, the property became Círculo Militar, a society of retired military officers.

Av. Santa Fe 750, C1059ABO, CABA, Argentina
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13 Falklands Fallen Monument at San Martín Plaza in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

For about ten weeks in 1982, Argentina battled the United Kingdom for control over the Falkland Islands. They lost the conflict to the British and also lost 649 soldiers. In 1990, this cenotaph named Monumento a los Caídos en Malvinas was created in San Martín Plaza to honor the fallen. In the background is the Kavanagh Building. When this Art Deco apartment complex opened in 1936, it was the tallest high-rise in Latin America at 390 feet. Its namesake is Corina Kavanagh. She was a rich socialite who commissioned the skyscraper and lived on the entire 14th floor.

50, Av. del Libertador, CABA, Argentina
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14 Leandro Alem Monument at San Martín Plaza in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Leandro N. Alem was a political activist. His legacy is founding the Civic Union Party in 1890 and leading the Revolution in the Park. This bloody event in today’s Plaza Lavalle led to the resignation of abusive President Miguel Celman. The monument by sculptor Pedro Zonza was erected at San Martín Plaza in 1925. Avenida Leandro N. Alem, one of the largest boulevards in Buenos Aires, was also named in his memory.

Maipú 1270, C1006ACT, CABA, Argentina
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15 Torre Monumental in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Across Avenue del Liberator from San Martín Plaza is Plaza Fuerza Aérea Argentina. The focal point of Argentina Air Force Square is a 248 foot tall, standalone clocktower. Torre Monumental was a gift of the British to help commemorate the 100th anniversary of the May Revolution in 1810. The Palladian design by architect Ambrose Macdonald Poynter features red brick between extremes crafted from white Portland stone. On the façade of Tower of the English are reliefs representing Scotland, Wales, Ireland and England. The locals like calling the monument the Argentine Big Ben.

Av. Dr. José María Ramos Mejía 1315, C1104, CABA, Argentina
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16 Retiro Mitre Railway Station in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Retiro is a major terminus for transportation. Clustered together are a bus station (Terminal de Ómnibus de Retiro) and three train stations. The most impressive is Retiro Mitre. The design is Edwardian Baroque. This style was popular in the United Kingdom during the reign of King Edward VII (1901 – 1910). Much of the building was prefabricated in Liverpool, England, by British architects. The Retiro Mitre Railway Station was declared a National Monument in 1997.

Av. Dr. José María Ramos Mejía 1430, C1104, CABA, Argentina
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17 Retiro Belgrano Railway Station in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Another of the three train stations is Retiro Belgrano. It was built in 1914 by Córdoba Central Railway. This British-owned company was founded in 1887 and operated until purchased by Argentina in 1938. A decade later, the line became a subset of Belgrano Railway. The nationalized train line was named in honor of Manuel Belgrano. He was a military leader during the Argentine War of Independence and one of the country’s Libertadores.

Av. Dr. José María Ramos Mejía 1430, C1104, CABA, Argentina
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18 National Railway Museum in Retiro, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Train aficionados will enjoy visiting the modest yet interesting National Railway Museum. Among the exhibits are artifacts and mementos representing the country’s train history since the first track was laid in 1857. At its zenith, the Argentine rail network covered over 29,000 miles. It is still the eighth largest in the world.

Av. del Libertador 405, C1001ABD, CABA, Argentina
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19 Recoleta Cemetery in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Recoleta is an affluent neighborhood comprising nearly 3.75 square miles. Among tourists, the barrio is best known for its cemetery. Really? Yes, really! Since 1822, a simple graveyard evolved into a spectacular necropolis containing over 6,000 above-ground vaults across 14 acres. Most are elaborate family mausoleums crafted in rich architectural styles and decorated with marble sculptures. Buried here are many prominent citizens including 18 former Argentine presidents. Maps are available to identify the famous tombs. Among them are fascinating stories, such as the one of Rufina Cambacérès. According to legend, the 19-year-old girl portrayed in this full-size sculpture was presumed dead but actually buried alive.

Junín 1760, C1113, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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20 Our Lady of Pilar Basilica in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A contingency of friars from the Order of Recollects arrived in Buenos Aires early in the 18th century. Juan de Narbona, a local Spanish merchant, provided funds for their church. He named it Our Lady of Pilar after the patron saint from his home town in Spain. The golden Baroque reredos on the high altar is among the highlights. Located next to Recoleta Cemetery, the city’s second oldest church was declared a basilica in 1936 and a National Historical Monument in 1942.

Junín 1898, C1113AAV, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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21 Recoleta Cultural Centre in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Adjacent to Our Lady of Pilar Basilica is a former convent dating from 1732. After the Franciscans were expelled from Argentina in 1821, the property was expropriated. It was repurposed several times, including a school, military barracks and home for seniors and the poor. In 1980, the historic building was transformed into the Recoleta Cultural Centre. The 27 rooms, amphitheater and auditorium of Centro Cultural Recoleta host a variety of events including concerts, stage performances and art exhibits.

Junín 1930, C1113 AAX, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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22 El Aleph Auditorium at Recoleta Cultural Centre in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The architectural masterstroke of Recoleta Cultural Centre is this handsome, red brick structure with Gothic elements and an Italian flare. This was the Chapel of the Asylum when designed by Juan Antonio Buschiazzo. He was the prolific director of public works during the late 19th century. In 2010, it was transformed into El Aleph Auditorium. At the base is a lovely terrace with several restaurants.

Junín 2000, C1113AAX, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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23 Torcuato de Alvear Memorial in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

In 1880, Buenos Aires was federalized and became the nation’s capital. The city was managed by a municipal commission and Torcuato de Alvear became its president. Three years later, he became the first mayor of Buenos Aires. During his term through 1887, he spearheaded several public works including a new port, boulevards, parks, plazas and buildings. The Monument to the Intendant Torcuato María de Alvea was raised in his honor in 1900. The winged sculpture on top of the marble column represents glory. The tribue is located in Plaza Mayor Alvear (also called Intendente Alvear Square) in front of the Recoleta Cultural Centre and Cemetery.

Emilio Pettorutti 2188-2200, C1129AAQ, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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24 Gran Gomero in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

There is an abundance of trees in Recoleta, so this one is easy to miss. Yet the observant will notice its width of over 165 feet. The roots of this rubber tree are enormous. Several branches – up to 100 feet in length – are so heavy they need support. Since 2014, one of the columns was replaced with a sculpture titled The Atlas of Recoleta. The locals call this famous tree Gran Gomero. Apparently, it was planted by the Franciscan monks in 1800. Others claim it dates from either 1781 or 1791. Regardless, it is the oldest tree in the city. In 2006, its image was incorporated into the shield of Recoleta neighborhood.

Pres. Roberto M. Ortiz 1839-1885, C1113ABA, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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25 National Museum of Fine Arts in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The National Museum of Fine Arts began in 1895 and soon evolved into a major cultural institution in Buenos Aires. The current exhibition space of nearly 50,000 square feet across 32 halls displays art from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Represented are critically-acclaimed Argentine and Spanish artists. Admission is free. This is the entrance to the adjoining Friends of the National Museum of Fine Arts. Amigos de Bellas Artes is the non-profit association that supports the museum.

Av. del Libertador 1473, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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26 University of Buenos Aires Law School in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Over 300,000 graduate and undergraduate students attend the University of Buenos Aires … tuition free. This qualifies UBA as Latin America’s largest university. Since 1949, the Law School (Facultad de Derecho) has been housed in this impressive Neoclassical structure. Most of the university’s programs are scattered around the city as opposed to being on a central campus.

Av. Pres. Figueroa Alcorta 2263, C1425CKB, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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27 Floralis Genérica in Recoleta, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Such a simple concept beautifully executed! Floralis Genérica is a 75 foot high, 52 feet wide stainless steel flower. The six petals open in the morning revealing the slender styles and cap-shaped stigmas. When they close near sunset, the flower glows red. The 18 ton sculpture is encircled by a reflection pond. This crowd-pleasing attraction by architect Eduardo Catalano is located in Plaza de las Naciones Unidas (United Nations Plaza).

Av. Pres. Figueroa Alcorta 2301, C1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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28 MALBA in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Palermo is the largest neighborhood in Buenos Aires with a population of about 250,000 residents. The barrio is characterized by homes of the social elite, foreign embassies and many of the city’s best parks. Your first stop is MALBA. The Latin American Art Museum of Buenos Aires was founded by real estate developer Eduardo Francisco Costantini. The museum was seeded with over 200 pieces of modern art from his personal collection. Inside this cubism-inspired building, the art is divided by decade so you can witness the evolution of styles during the 20th century. MALBA also sponsors visiting exhibitions by Argentine artists.

Av. Pres. Figueroa Alcorta 3415, C1425 CLA, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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29 Japanese Garden Torii in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Emperors set the standard for traditional Japanese gardens over 1,300 years ago. Their groomed landscape symbolizes the beauty of land, water and nature. You can experience the best one in South America at Jardín Japonés de Buenos Aires. Among the features are pavilions, restaurant, tea room, cultural center and artesian shop. Shown here is a red torri constructed in 2017 to celebrate the garden’s 50th anniversary. Behind it is the Tokyo Hall Exhibitions building.

Av. Casares 2966, C1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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30 Japanese Garden Footbridge in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Total tranquility! That is the wonderful feeling you have while strolling around the 4.9 acre Japanese Garden in Palermo. In the center is a lake. Swimming beneath the calm waters are colorful koi (Amur carp). Take your time admiring the sculpted bushes, the occasional stone lantern (tōrō), a peaceful waterfall and three footbridges.

Av. Casares 2966, C1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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31 Botanical Garden Greenhouse in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Buenos Aires Botanical Garden beckons you. Enveloped within 17.25 acres are over 5,000 species of plants. They are nestled into sections resembling Asian, French, African, Roman and American garden styles. This Art Nouveau greenhouse is the largest of five on the estate. The splendid environment was designed by Carlos Thays in the 1890s. He is the same talented landscape architect who shaped the largest park in Buenes Aires: Parque Tres de Febrero.

Av. Santa Fe 3951, C1425 EYD, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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32 Botanical Garden Sculptures in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Accenting Carlos Thays Botanical Garden are about 30 sculptures. Most are reproductions of famous art. This charismatic piece titled Canto de la Cosechadora (Song of the Harvester) portrays a maiden carrying an autumn crop. The marble original is attributed to Antonio Canova (1757 – 1822), an anclaimed Neoclassical sculptor from Venice. Other works you will recognize in Jardín Botánico are Venus de Medici and the Capitoline Wolf showing Romulus and Remus being nursed by a shewolf.

Av. Santa Fe 3951, C1425 EYD, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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33 Pavilion at Eco-Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The entrance gate to the Buenos Aires Zoo opened in 1875. Over the decades, it grew into a sweeping 45 acre park. At the summit, over 2,500 animals were displayed. In 2016, a decision was made to close the attraction. Most of the animals were released into the wild or sent to other zoos. A subsequent announcement proclaimed the property would be transformed into the Buenos Aires Eco-Park. The city’s intentions may have been good. However, the results have fallen short of expectations. Although people enjoy walking along a pond and among the old pavilions, the Eco-Park pales in comparison to other splendid greenspaces in Buenos Aires.

Sarmiento 2601, C1045 ABC, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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34 Patagonian Hare at Eco-Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

One of the few animals roaming freely at the Buenos Aires Eco-Park is the Patagonian hare. This large rodent (27 to 30 inches) resembling a jackrabbit is indigenous to Argentina. It is entertaining to watch as monogamous pairs hop along while grazing on tall grass. Especially cute are the young Patagonian maras. New litters are born in September and October.

Sarmiento 2601, C1045 ABC, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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35 Monument of the Spanish in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Monument of the Spanish glorifies a busy roundabout in Palermo. The marble monolith is adorned with allegories. On top is Libertas representing Argentina. Below her are three statutes for peace, justice and agriculture. At the base are the country’s four regions plus an intricate frieze showing a renewed union between Argentina and Spain. The 80 foot monument was commissioned to celebrate the May Revolution centennial. This was the first event by Buenos Aires to seek independence from Spain. However, Monumento de los Españoles was not finished until 1927.

Av. del Libertador, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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36 Greek Bridge over Lake at February 3 Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Parque Tres de Febrero is a spacious oasis of scenery and relaxation. Within nearly 1,000 acres are lakes, gardens, sculptures, museums, an island (La Isla) and a Greek footbridge (often called Lover’s Bridge) … all nestled in a tree-lined setting. Families enjoy paddling around this 8.5 acre Lake Rosedal. The grounds are equally popular among strollers, joggers and bicyclists. The name February 3 Park stems from the day in 1852 when Juan Manuel de Rosas’s dictatorship ended as governor of Buenos Aires Province. This municipal park was part of his extensive property.

Paseo del Rosedal, Av. Infanta Isabel, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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37 Rose Garden at February 3 Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The botanical high point of Parque Tres de Febrero is Paseo del Rosedal. Manicured footpaths allow you to savor and smell while strolling among nearly 20,000 roses within 8.5 acres. White pergolas, a gazebo, five water fountains and benches enhance the ambiance of Jardín de Rosas (Rose Garden). Another engaging feature is Poet’s Garden containing 26 busts of famous writers.

Paseo del Rosedal, Av. Infanta Isabel, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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38 Eduardo Sívori Museum at February 3 Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Across from the Rose Garden is Eduardo Sívori Museum. The gallery is housed in the old El Hostal del Ciervo Café and an adjoining annex. Since beginning in 1938, the municipal art collection has grown to over 4,000 pieces by Argentine artists. The museum’s namesake is Eduardo Sívori. During the height of his career in the late 19th century, he was Argentina’s first realist painter. In 1875, he founded Society for the Promotion of Fine Arts.

Av. Infanta Isabel 555, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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39 Justo José de Urquiza Monument in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This equestrian monument is a tribute to Justo José de Urquiza. He was a statesman and general best known for overthrowing dictator Juan Manuel de Rosas at the Battle of Caseros in 1852. Then, as the Director of the Argentine Confederation, he instituted a new constitution for the country. Urquiza was assassinated in 1870. The bronze sculpture by Renzo Baldi and Héctor Rocha was erected in 1958.

Av. Sarmiento y Roldan Belisario Av., C1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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40 Planetarium at February 3 Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Are you fascinated by the stars, constellations, planets and galaxies? Then do not miss visiting Galileo Galilei Planetarium. Planetario has been delighting wannabe astronomers of all ages since opening in Parque Tres de Febrero in 1968. Inside this giant, flying-saucer-shaped sphere are over 100 projectors showing close-ups of orbiting bodies. Interactive exhibits and telescope sessions reveal the wonders of the heavens. You can also see a lunar rock gifted by U.S. President Nixon.

Av. Sarmiento y Roldan Belisario Av., C1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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41 Argentine Hippodrome of Palermo in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Porteños (residents of Buenos Aires) have enjoyed wagering on horses since the first race in 1876. The sport became so popular, this magnificent Beaux Arts facility was built in 1908. The grandstand of the Hipódromo Argentino de Palermo is often crowded. There is not a bad seat to witness the fast-equestrian action around the 1.5 mile track. The annual highlight is the Argentine Derby of three-year-old colts called Gran Premio Nacional (National Grand Prize) in mid-November. Betting between races is also active on the slot machines.

Av. del Libertador 4101, C1426, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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42 Lago de Regatas at February 3 Park in Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The largest lake in Parque Tres de Febrero is Lago de Regatas. The 1.2 mile circumference makes this a favored place for serious runners. Families and couples appreciate the absence of crowds. Birdwatchers clutch their binoculars while trying to identify over 30 species in the trees, on the islands and in the pristine water. Kayakers also have fun here. The lake is adjacent to the 18-hole municipal golf course Juan Bautista Segura.

Lago de Regatas, Av. De los Ombúes, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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43 Memory Park in Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A dark period in Argentine history was from 1976 until 1983. After the military seized power, the new dictatorship launched a campaign of brutal repression called the National Reorganization Process. Their crimes included torture, murders and countless disappearances. The 34.5 acre Memory Park along the Río de la Plata was created to honor and remember the victims. Among the 18 sculptures in Parque de la Memoria is this untiled piece by Roberto Aizenberg. The silhouettes represent his pregnant wife and children who went missing in 1976 as a result of the “Dirty War.”

Av. Costanera Rafael Obligado 6745, C1428 DAA, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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44 Río de la Plata Promenade in Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Starting at Memory Park and extending to the Jorge Newbery Airfield is a delightful riverfront promenade along Río de la Plata. This quiet, tree-lined esplanade is frequented by joggers, strollers and cyclists. Along the way are a lagoon, waterpark (Aqua Events), biblical Holy Land theme park (Tierra Santa), gym, skateboard park, sailboat marina and plenty of restaurants.

Av. Costanera Rafael Obligado 6745, C1428 DAA, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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