Córdoba, Spain

Since 200 BC, Romans, Visigoths, Muslims and Christians have ruled and shaped Córdoba. Come see why the historic section of this Andalusian city in southern Spain has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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1 Origin of Mosque-Cathedral in Córdoba, Spain

After Prince Abd al-Rahman I fled from Damascus when his family was overthrown, he declared himself to be the First Emir of Córdoba in 756. Starting in 784, he began his vision of creating the world’s greatest mosque. His descendants continued construction for the next two centuries until Al-Mansur Ibn Abi Aamir finished the Mezquita in 987. Although the Catholics converted the mosque into a cathedral staring in 1523, the building retains much of its original design. Some experts believe it is the best example of Islamic architecture. An exterior illustration is the Puerta de San Juan, located along the east facade. Inside are rooms defined by over 850 columns made from marble, jasper and onyx. You will also see Moorish arches – some horseshoe and others semi-circular – adorned by mosaics made from gold, silver and bronze.

Calle Magistral González Francés, 13, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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2 Conversion of Mosque into Cathedral in Córdoba, Spain

In 1523, Bishop Manrique decided to convert the Great Mosque of Córdoba into a Catholic cathedral. The architect, Hernán Ruiz I, recommended tearing down the center of the Islamic building constructed from 784 to 987. Thus began the blending of two cultures, two religions and several architectural styles including Islamic, Gothic, Baroque and Renaissance. An example is this 305 foot steeple. It was built as a minaret in the 10th century. During the late 16th and early 17th centuries, it was reshaped into a bell tower called Torre de Alminar. The resulting Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption – commonly called the Mezquita de Córdoba – is the architectural jewel of this UNESCO World Heritage Site city.

Calle del Cardenal Herrero, 1, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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3 Puerta de Santa Catalina into Mosque-Cathedral in Córdoba, Spain

There are about 20 doors on the exterior of the Great Mosque leading into the 590 x 425 foot structure. The Puerta de Santa Catalina is on the east side and enters into the courtyard called the Patio of Oranges (Patio de los Naranjos). The portal was designed by Hernán Ruiz II and finished in 1573, a few years after the master of Spanish Renaissance architecture died. The Door of Santa Catalina features four columns with Corinthian capitals, a bishop’s shield between the arch and frieze and three frescos by Antonio del Castillo. The center painting represents the gate’s namesake, Saint Catherine of Alexandra. Originally, this doorway was near the Convent of Santa Catalina. The saint was martyred for her Christian beliefs in 305.

Calle Magistral González Francés, 7, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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4 Corregidor Luis de la Cerda in Córdoba, Spain

These arched balconies with faded frescos are on the Great Mosque’s southern façade. Although interesting, they pale in comparison to the rest of Mezquita Catedral. If you stand here, your attention will be focused towards Puerta de Puente and the Roman Bridge. However, the street has an interesting history. Its namesake is Luis de la Cerda, a Corregidor (mayor) who defied Bishop Manrique by trying to stop converting the mosque into a cathedral. Together with members of the town hall, he posted a public notice in 1523 declaring anyone who dared alter the building would be arrested and subsequently executed. His orders were overruled by Charles V in 1543. Years later, when the king visited Córdoba, he regretted his decision by saying in part, “… (you) have undone what was unique in the world.”

Calle Corregidor Luis de la Cerda, 83,14003 Córdoba, Spain
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5 Hermitage of the Conception in Córdoba, Spain

The red painted façade of the Hermitage of the Conception is located in the Plaza de Abades (Square of Abbots). According to legend, a mason named Diego de la Rocha was working in a small house when he discovered an image of the Virgin Mary behind a wall. She was holding two glowing lanterns which quickly went out. Later, during a procession of the Blessed Sacrament, the lanterns spontaneously relit while spilling out endless oil. A hermit kept the lanterns lite. This chapel was built in 1750 to hold the icon yet closed at the end of the 19th century. Since then, the Convent of Santa Clara successfully claimed the Virgin in a lawsuit.

Plaza de Abades, 9, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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6 Tower of Calahorra in Córdoba, Spain

The Tower of Calahorra stands on the south bank of the Guadalquivir River near the entrance to the Roman Bridge. Two sections were constructed in the 12th century by Muslims when Córdoba was part of the Al-Andalus territory, also known as Islamic Iberia. The medieval fortress is now a history museum of that era (9th – 13th centuries) called the Al-Andalus Living Museum. The center section of the tower was added in the mid-14th century by Henry II. Enrique II was the first King of Castile and León from the House of Trastámara. His nemesis was his half-brother, Peter the Cruel, who he killed in 1369.

Periodista Alberto Almansa, 2, 14009 Córdoba, Spain
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7 Roman Bridge in Córdoba, Spain

The Roman Bridge derives its name from when it was built by command of Augustus. He was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire who reigned from 27 BC until 14 AD. The crossing over the Guadalquivir River was reconstructed in the early 8th century by Al-Samh, the Arab governor of Al-Andalus. This was the Muslim territory comprising most of today’s Portugal and Spain. Additional renovations and expansions occurred during five centuries yet it has largely maintained its medieval appearance. The 820 foot length of Puente Romano is supported by 16 arches. The landmarks in the background are (left to right): The Bishop’s Palace, Triumph of San Raphael, the Puerta de Puente and the Mosque-Cathedral.

Puente Romano, 14009 Córdoba, Spain
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8 San Raphael Statue in Córdoba, Spain

This statue in the middle of the Roman Bridge was sculpted by Bernabé Gómez del Rio during the 17th century. This image of Saint Raphael the Archangel is one of several around Córdoba According to the Gospel of John, the angel is responsible for healing. Interestingly, a version of the saint is part of the religious traditions of Christianity, Muslims and Judaism. This seemed to be the perfect choice for the protector of Córdoba with its multiple cultures.

Puente Romano, 14009 Córdoba, Spain
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9 Puerta de Puente in Córdoba, Spain

First the Romans and then the Arabs had a gate here along the north bank of the Guadalquivir River into the city’s eastern section. In 1572, Alonso Gonzalez de Arteaga commissioned a new one. The work was performed by Hernán Ruiz III. He was the son of Andalusia’s most prolific architect during the first half of the 16th century. In the early 1900’s, Bridge Gate was transformed when the old city walls were removed. The Renaissance design of Puerta de Puente features four, fluted Doric columns plus pilasters. The center relief shows soldiers flanking the coat of arms of Phillip II. At various times during the 16th century, Felipe II was the King of Spain, Portugal, England and Ireland.

Av. del Alcázar, 512, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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10 Bishop’s Palace in Córdoba, Spain

This site near the Mosque Cathedral was first a Visigoth and then a Muslim palace. After Ferdinand II gave it to the Bishop of Cordoba in 1236, it became the Bishop’s Palace. The original structure underwent significant changes from the 15th through the 19th centuries. In 1989, Palacio Episcopal was converted into the Diocesan Fine Arts Museum. Museo Diocesano displays religious artifacts, art and furniture dating back to medieval times.

Amador De Los Ríos, 1, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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11 Triumph of San Raphael in Córdoba, Spain

During the 18th century, numerous statues of Saint Raphael the Archangel were erected to protect the city against the plaque. Of the eight “triumphs” that remain in Córdoba, the most majestic was sculpted by Miguel de Verdiguer and erected near the Roman Bridge in 1765. The column stands on a base consisting of a castle, rocks and a grotto. These are symbolic of heaven, earth and hell.

Av. del Alcázar, 512, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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12 History of Diocese of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain

Since the Diocese of Córdoba began in the late 3rd century, they suffered several periods of persecution. The first was in 304 when Bishop Osio and five others were executed by Roman Emperor Diocletian. After the Muslim invasion in 711, all Christian churches were banned. The next 500 plus years witnessed an era ranging from a tolerant coexistence with Christians to further executions between 851 and 859. The Diocese finally gained religious freedom after the Reconquest in 1236 and the appointment of Bishop Lope de Fitero in 1238. Want to learn more? Then visit this building located riverside near La Mezquita. It is the Diocesan Library of Córdoba.

Amador De Los Ríos, 1, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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13 Albolafia Mill in Córdoba, Spain

The Romans were the first to deploy hydraulics in Córdoba. Later there were eleven waterwheels known as the Mills of the Guadalquivir. The most famous is the Albolafia Mill located along the southern riverbank near the Roman Bridge. Molino de la Albolafia was built to carry water to the palace of Abd-ar-Rahman II while he was Emir of Córdoba (822 – 852). Speculation is it was rebuilt in 1137. The watermill was dismantled during the 15th century because Isabella I of Castile was annoyed by its squeaking. The Albolafia Mill has been an element of the city’s heraldic shield since the 13th century.

Av. del Alcázar, 512, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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14 Tribute Tower at Alcázar of Córdoba, Spain

This site has a long history of being a fortress and palace for Romans, Visigoths and Muslims. Most of the Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos we see today was rebuilt by King Alfonso XI of Castile starting in 1327. Although he was Catholic, his palace was designed using a Mudéjar style favored by the Muslims of Al-Andalus. Historical events here included a civil war fought by Henry IV of Castile against his half-brother, residency of monarchs including Isabella I and Ferdinand II, the financing for the first voyage of Christopher Columbus, the center for the Spanish Inquisition for three centuries, a military garrison run by Napoleon’s army in 1810 and a jail before being opened to the public. Inside are two lovely courtyards, displays of Roman and Moorish artifacts plus a royal bath. These people are walking at the base of the Tribute Tower. It is also called the Homage Tower because it was the venue for knights to swear their allegiance.

Plaza Campo Santo de los Mártires, s/n, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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15 Tower of the Inquisition at Alcázar of Córdoba, Spain

The Tower of the Inquisition was built during the rule of Henry IV of Castile (1425 – 1474), making it the youngest of Alcázar’s three remaining towers. It also was the archives for the Spanish Inquisition which lasted from 1478 until 1834. This dark side of Spanish history was launched by the Catholic Monarchs to purify their kingdom. They required all Jews and Muslims to either convert to Catholicism or be exiled, punished or executed. Over 150,000 people were found guilty of crimes and 2,000 were brutally killed. Many of the tortures and punishments were conducted within the Alcázar, the headquarters for the Tribunal of the Holy Office. The Inquisition Tower now contains Roman mosaics.

Plaza Campo Santo de los Mártires, s/n, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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16 Gardens at Alcázar of Córdoba, Spain

On the west side of the Alcázar is a beautiful, 13.5 acre garden. Among its three terraces are four, rectangular pools built in the 19th century. During the Islamic era, water for the palace came from the mountains via an aqueduct and the Guadalquivir River pumped by the Albolafia Mill. The gardens are also filled with fruit, palm and cypress trees plus flowerbeds. Among the walkways of Paseo de los Reyes are several monarch statues. The most famous memorializes a meeting that occurred here among Christopher Columbus and the Catholic Monarchs who financed his expeditions. The lions and castles on this gate respectively symbolize the Kingdoms of León and Castile, a union created when Queen Isabella I and King Ferdinand II married in 1469.

Plaza Campo Santo de los Mártires, s/n, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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17 Palace at Holy Martyrs Field in Córdoba, Spain

This palace was commissioned in the late 16th century by a canon of the Mezquita. Its inscription reads, “Salus Infirmorum.” This references when it was a hospital managed by the Servants of Mary, Ministers of the Sick. Since 1995, it has housed the Institute for Advance Social Studies. Next to it are the Caliphal Baths discovered in 1964. The Baths of Alcázar were built in the late 10th century for ablutions by Al-Hakam II, the Caliph of Córdoba. Both of these landmarks are located in an unassuming park named Campo Santo of the Martyrs. The Holy Martyrs Field is where Córdobans were executed for proclaiming their Christian faith by the Romans in 304 AD.

Plaza Campo Santo de los Mártires, 7, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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18 History City Walls in Córdoba, Spain

The history of Córdoba’s walls goes back over 2,200 years. First the Romans built an 8,690 foot fortification following the Battle of Ilipa in 206 BC. Some sections were torn down for urban expansion after Roman Emperor Augustus granted the city Colonia Patricia status in 46 AD. During the Islamic rule, few changes were made from 711 until the 11th century. That changed radically after 1085. The Muslims encircled the Axerquía suburb to the east of the old Roman settlement of Medina. The defenses from both eras were breeched in 1236 by the Christians. Afterwards, they strengthened existing walls and extended them to the south during the 14th century. Additional reconstruction occurred in the 15th and 16th centuries. Finally, after the walls lost their protective value, many were demolished in the 19th century. This wall along Calle Cairuán was constructed by the Christians in the 14th century. The white statue by artist Pablo Yusti on the left is Averroes, a 14th century philosopher.

Calle Cairuan, 25, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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19 Calle Cairuán in Córdoba, Spain

This area within the Jewish Quarter was formerly named Huerta del Ray. During the 1960’s, it was extensively refurbished from a polluted creek into fresh water flanked with flowers and spanned by footbridges. The channel runs along a 14th century Christian wall which replaced a Roman defense. Cut through the medieval stronghold is an entrance to the Hotel Amistad. Also along this street is the Almodóvar Gate from the 8th century. The street was renamed Calle Cairuán in 2009 in recognition of Córdoba’s “twinning” with the Tunisian city of Kairouan (Cairuán).

Calle Cairuan, 14, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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20 Fernandine Churches in Córdoba, Spain

On June 29, 1236, Ferdinand III of Castile liberated Córdoba from Moorish rule. The king quickly began restoring Christianity by giving land often occupied by mosques to build churches around the city (then called Ajerquía). The first was San Pablo, named in recognition of Córdoba’s liberation on the feast day of Saint Paul. See the other photo of the Church of San Pablo to learn more about its history. There are a dozen churches in Córdoba established during this Reconquista period. Collectively they are called the Fernandinas Churches (Fernandine Churches in English). Several of them are featured in this gallery.

Calle Capitulares, 18, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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21 Church of San Pablo Gate in Córdoba, Spain

In 1241, King Ferdinand III gave the Dominican Order land to establish the Convent of San Pablo the Real. The friars flourished for centuries, building an elaborate complex and church during the 13th and 14th centuries. This ornate Baroque façade was created in 1708. The entrance features a statue of Saint Paul in a clamshell-shaped niche above twisted columns called Salomonica. After the French occupation in the early 19th century, the Church of San Pablo was threated to be demolished. Fortunately, this first of the Fernandine Churches was restored by the Religious of the Heart of Mary in the early 20th century.

Calle Capitulares, 18, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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22 Roman Temple in Córdoba, Spain

This ancient colonnade is a reminder of Córdoba’s fascinating Roman history dating back to 206 BC. For example, in 49 BC, Julius Caesar attacked the capital city of the Hispania Baetica province (Córdoba’s name in antiquity) and killed over 20,000 citizens. In direct contrast, the dictator’s successor, Caesar Augustus, was benevolent. The first Roman Emperor honored the city with Colonia Patricia status. Their resulting prosperity is evident by this Roman temple discovered in 1951. These fluted, Corinthian columns are part of the Provincial Forum built during the second half of the 1st century. This tribute to the emperor measured 105 feet long and 52.5 feet wide.

Calle Capitulares, s/n, 14003 Córdoba, Spain
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23 Plaza de la Corredera in Córdoba, Spain

The Plaza de la Corredera has been important to Córdobans since it was constructed by architect Antonio Ramos Valdes in 1683. It has been the venue for bullfights and executions. The buildings served as homes, a city hall and a prison until the mid-19th century. In 1846, Sánchez Peña converted it into a factory. During the first half of the 20th century, the large, rectangular space hosted a marketplace. A major renovation was finished in 2001. The upper floors are now apartments. The outdoor restaurants nestled among the arched porticos are popular among tourists and the locals. And early birds enjoy shopping for produce at the Mercado de la Corredera.

Plaza de la Corredera, s/n, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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24 Monument to the Beautiful of Córdoban Women in Córdoba, Spain

This grouping is called the, “Monument to the Beauty of Cordoban Women.” The two female figures holding pitchers are drawing water from a tiered, marble fountain. Artist José Manuel Belmonte created this lovely ensemble in 2003. The monument is located at Plaza de Colón. This large, tree-lined public park created in 1888 offers a wonderful respite from the inner city

Plaza de Colón, s/n, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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25 Palacio de la Merced in Córdoba, Spain

Saint Peter Nolasco founded the Mercedarian Order in 1230 devoted to ransoming captive Christians from the Moors. After Ferdinand III of Castile liberated Córdoba in 1236, he gave this land to the friar’s for their convent of Our Lady of Mercy. Most of that structure was replaced by this Baroque church built in 1745. About 100 years later, Palacio de la Merced became a hospital. Then, in 1960, it was converted into offices for the Provincial Council of Córdoba.

Plaza de Colón, 15, 14001 Córdoba, Spain

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26 Torre de la Malmuerta in Córdoba, Spain

The octagonal Malmuerta Tower was constructed in 1408 to protect the northern city gate of Puerta del Rincon. Notice the large archway. This was a bridge leading from the defensive curtainwall to the detached watchtower. This fortification style is called an Albarrana Tower. The design was favored by the Muslims when they occupied Spain. Torre de la Malmuerta in English means, “Tower of the Wrongly Dead Woman.” The name is derived from the legend of a knight, Fernando Alfonso, who falsely accused his wife of adultery before murdering her and her suspected lover.

Torre de la Malmuerta, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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27 Slope Bailiff in Córdoba, Spain

Our Lady of Peace and Hope Plaza (Nuestra Señora de la Paz y Esperanza Plaza) is part of Slope Bailiff. These 31 steps once connected the old Roman Medina with the Axerquía suburb created during the Islamic rule. Surrounding the staircase are former mansions of the Corbacho and Cárcamo families. As knights in the Order of Saint John, they had the designation of Bailío (Bailiff in English). On the left is Casa del Bailío. The Bailiff House was built during the 16th century and is now the Al-Andalus Living Library.

Nuestra Señora de la Paz y Esperanza, 4,, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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28 Reception Courtyard of Viana Palace in Córdoba, Spain

The Palace of Viana has been owned by only a few families since its construction in the late 15th century. The Lords of Villaseca occupied it for over 200 years (1492 – 1704), followed by the Marquises of Villaseca (1704 – 1871). The estate received its name when the 2nd Marquis of Viana inherited the property in 1871. José Saavedra y Salamanca used his riches to expand the palace and fill it with treasures. In 1981, Palacio de Viana opened to the public. Tourists are delighted by the seven courtyards constructed over five centuries. A beautiful example is the Reception Courtyard. The space is defined by 16 Tuscan columns with blue window frames. It was created in the early 17th century for Luis Gómez de Figueroa, 2nd Lord of Villaseca.

Plaza de Don Gome, 2, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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29 Church of Santa Marina in Córdoba, Spain

Similar to many of the Fernandine Churches in Córdoba, Iglesia de Santa Marina de Aguas Santas occupies land where a Visigoth church and later a mosque once stood. Construction began in the late 13th century and finished in the 14th. The very large façade of the Church of Santa Marina – resembling a fortress – is bland except for the dominate rose window. The more attractive, 16th bell tower by Hernán Ruiz II has a Renaissance design. This church dedicated to Saint Mary Magdalene has had a challenging history. It was severely damaged by earthquakes in 1680 and 1755 plus fires in 1889 and 1936. Its last restoration was in 1998. Admission is free to see the lovely altarpiece dedicated to Our Lady of the Rosary (Virgin of El Rosario).

Plaza de Sta. Marina, 1, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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30 Church of San Agustín in Córdoba, Spain

The origin of Inglesia de San Agustín dates back to 1328 when it was an Augustinian convent. The bell tower was added during the 16th century. The Catholic church underwent a significant renovation in the 17th century. In 1808, the building was heavily damaged when commandeered by Napoleon Bonaparte’s army during their occupation of Córdoba. For the next 100 years, the Church of Saint Augustine languished in disrepair. Then, after a complete restoration, the church resumed religious services in 2009.

Plaza de San Agustín, 7, 14001 Córdoba, Spain
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31 Church of San Lorenzo in Córdoba, Spain

Prior to the early 8th century, a Visigoth church stood on this site. Then a Moslem mosque was built here in a district then called al-Mugira. After Ferdinand III conquest in 1236, the property was given to Christians and dedicated to Saint Lorenzo Ruiz. The Moorish minaret was converted into a Romanesque bell tower by Hernán Ruiz the Younger during the 16th century. Iglesia de San Lorenzo’s elaborate rose window (called a rosetón in Spanish) is a feature of several Fernandine Churches in Córdoba. However, the portico formed by three arches is fairly unique.

Plaza de San Lorenzo, 5, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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32 Church of Saint Andrews Bell Tower in Córdoba, Spain

Construction of the Saint Andrews Church began in 1246 and was finished in 1277. Similar to the other 13th century Córdoban churches sponsored by Ferdinand III, Inglesia de San Andrés has undergone several renovations that altered its architecture. For example, only one of its three doors dates back to medieval times. Most of the 18th century façade has a white and cream color scheme. This is punctuated by a Renaissance bell tower commissioned by Bishop Fray Martín during the 16th century. Notice how the four corners of this belfry are rotated from its rectangular base below the balustrade.

Calle San Pablo, 31, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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33 Villalones Palace in Córdoba, Spain

Palacio de Orive was built in 1560 by architect Hernán Ruiz II. Look closely at the relief above the door. Some say the woman with open arms represents the daughter of Don Carlos de Unciel. He was the Corregidor of Córdoba (equivalent of a mayor) when he lived here. His young daughter Blanca was cursed for sneering at a gypsy. She was later tricked into descending a staircase that magically appeared in the house in search of a young man harboring jewels. After she entered, the portal closed and sealed her inside. According to the legend, her ghost still haunts the Villalones Palace. The building now serves as offices for the Department of Culture.

Plaza de Orive, 2, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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34 Sala Orive in Córdoba, Spain

The Convent of San Pablo was established in 1241. In the mid-16th century, Hernán Ruiz II was tasked with designing a chapter house for the friars. However, halfway through construction, the project stopped unfinished. During the War of Spanish Independence (1808 – 1814), the building was converted into a prison then later fell into ruins. After a significant restoration in 2009, Sala Orive opened as an exhibition hall, auditorium and theatre. The name means, “Living room of Orive” because it is located adjacent to the monastery’s old Orchard of Orive.

Calle San Pablo, 22, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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35 Basilica of San Pedro in Córdoba, Spain

During the mid-9th century, after 24 Christians publically pronounced their faith, they were beheaded by Abd ar-Rahman II. He was the leader of Al-Andalus, a Moorish territory including Córdoba. The Basilica of San Pedro stands above the graves of three martyrs who were executed by the Romans in the early 4th century. Inside is an altar by Alonso Gómez de Sandoval dedicated to them. Construction of this Fernandine Church began in the late 13th century. However, much of the façade is attributed to Hernán Ruiz II in 1542. Beneath the rose window is a statue of Saint Paul the Apostle. San Pablo was elevated to a minor basilica in 2006.

Plaza de San Pedro, 1, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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36 Chapel of Socorro in Córdoba, Spain

This chapel was called the Hospital of the Holy Trinity when it was built in 1685. Ten years later, Clemente de Cáceres founded Our Lady of Mercy and Holy Rosary. This evolved into the Brotherhood of Our Lady of Socorro. It is based on a Marian appearance when a sinner was running from a lynch mob, cried out for help on the chapel steps and was miraculous hidden. A centuries-old carving of La Virgen del Socorro (Virgin of Help) is displayed on the altar of Hermandad del Socrro. Each year, the religious icon is marched through the streets of Córdoba in a festive procession.

Plaza del Socorro, 1, 14002 Córdoba, Spain
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37 Municipal Bullfighting Museum in Córdoba, Spain

Spain’s first corrida (bullfight) occurred in 711. However, the act of dodging and stabbing a bull did not begin for another 1,000 years in 1724. Spanish-style bullfighting became a national sport and is deeply rooted in Córdoba’s culture. In 1954, the City Council began displaying bullfight art in a museum. As the collection grew, the venue for the artwork changed and closed several times. In 2014, this Museo Taurino de Córdoba opened with great fanfare. Some people abhor bullfighting’s brutality while others celebrate its legacy. Regardless of your position, you will be fascinated by this museum.

Plaza Maimónides, 5, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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