Central Buenos Aires, Argentina

Microcentro is the core of Buenos Aires. There is plenty of everything to interest, surprise and delight you: history, culture, shopping, dining, scenery and the tango are just a few. Start and return from your adventure along the riverfront. In between are memories waiting to be created.

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1 Microcentro Skyline of Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires is the capital of Argentina and the country’s largest city with a metro population of about 15.5 million people. This skyline showcases the historic, business, financial and shopping core. Microcentro, also called La City, encompasses parts of four districts. There is an abundance of exciting places to visit here. This travel guide provides a walking tour of the city’s epicenter. So, lace up your comfortable shoes and get started.

Pierina Dealessi 750, C1107 CKP, CABA, Argentina
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2 Río de la Plata from Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Your day of exploration begins along Río de la Plata. The river travels 180 miles before emptying into the South Atlantic Ocean. The mouth is an impressive 140 miles wide. Buenos Aires is defined by its western shore. This view of the city’s west bank is from a bridge in Puerto Madero on Macacha Güemes Boulevard. The street is named in honor of a heroine of the Argentine War of Independence.

Macacha Güemes 151, C1106BKC, CABA, Argentina
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3 Puerto Madero Neighborhood, Buenos Aires, Argentina

In 1887, businessman Eduardo Madero was commissioned to construct a new port (Puerto Nuevo) in closer proximity to Buenos Aires. The first dock was completed a decade later and continuously expanded until 1926. Over time, the area became derelict. In the 1990s, a major redevelopment was initiated. The elaborate project transformed less than one square mile into a spectacular urban setting. The old warehouses were refurbished and repurposed. The waterfront was revitalized. Hotels, restaurants, museums and entertainment options were added. An influx of investors began building luxury residential high-rises in 2000. In the middle is Alvear Tower. When finished in 2017, it became the city’s tallest skyscraper at 792 feet. Interestingly, all of the streets in this borough are named after Argentine women.

Olga Cossettini 831, CABA, Argentina
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4 Queen of Holland Square in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

As you walk along the Puerto Madero waterfront, you will encounter Plaza Reina de Holanda at the base of old silos. Funding for the Queen of Holland Square was provided by 19 Dutch companies. Among the features in this small park at former Dock 3 is a monument to Anne Frank. She wrote “The Diary of a Young Girl” before dying in a concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15.

Olga Cossettini 789, CABA, Argentina
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5 Holy Mary Shrine in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Few remnants of the old dockyards have gone unaltered in Puerto Madero. A charming exception is this humble shrine of Holly Mary holding the Infant Jesus. It was likely a place of reverence and prayer for departing seamen and those who had arrived safely in Buenos Aires. A version of the Virgin Mary named Stella Maris (Star of the Sea) is the patron saint of the Argentine Coast Guard.

Olga Cossettini 789, CABA, Argentina
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6 Women’s Bridge in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A visual highlight of Puerto Madero is Puente de la Mujer. The cable-stayed footbridge spans 557 feet over the Río de la Plata where it connects with the Microcentro on the western waterfront. The stunning design of the Women’s Bridge was drafted by famous Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. It opened at the end of 2001. The prominent needle with harp-like cables reaches an elevation of 112 feet. The center swings open for the passing of tall ships.

Puente de la Mujer, C1113, CABA, Argentina
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7 ARA Presidente Sarmiento in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

After crossing Women’s Bridge, the first attraction you will encounter is the ARA Presidente Sarmiento. This 266 foot training ship was built for the Argentine Naval Academy in 1897. After the vessel was taken out of service in 1961, it was converted into a maritime museum. This National Historic Monument is named after Domingo Faustino Sarmiento. He was the president of Argentina from 1868 until 1874.

Darsena 3, Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 900, C1107AAT, CABA, Argentina
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8 Customs House in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

You are now entering the Monserrat District (also spelled Montserrat). Many important government buildings are located in this old neighborhood. Among them is the Buenos Aires Customs House. The French Renaissance design – featuring twin turrets and Carrara marble cladding – is magnificent. The Aduana was built in 1910 when the port was flourishing with foreign trade. In the early 20th century, customs revenue generated over three-fourths of the country’s revenue. In front is a monument to Juan Domingo Perón. During the mid-20th century, this former Argentine Army general was Secretary of Labor, Minister of War, the country’s vice president and Argentina’s president for three terms.

Azopardo 250, C1091, CABA, Argentina
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9 Liberator Building in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A prominent landmark overshadowing the riverfront is the Ministry of Defense. When the twenty-story, French Renaissance structure was completed in 1943, it was Argentina’s largest building. Seven years later, it was named the Liberator Building on the occasion of the 100th year anniversary of General José de San Martín’s death. He was nicknamed The Liberator for winning Argentina’s independence in the early 1800s. A tunnel connects Edificio Liberator to the nearby president’s office, Casa Rosada.

Azopardo 250, C1107ADD, CABA, Argentina
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10 Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Plaza de Mayo is the most important square in Buenos Aires. This is where the Spanish colony was founded by a conquistador in 1580. By the end of the 16th century, the Royal Fort of Juan Baltasar of Austria was built here. El Fuerte was the residence of the Viceroys of the Río de la Plata from 1776 until the May Revolution. On May 25, 1810, a new local government called Primera Junta was established and Cornelio Saavedra was appointed as the first president. In short, you are standing at the birthplace of the city, the location of the first attempt at self-government and the origin for the Argentine War of Independence leading to final freedom from Spain. Let’s look around at the landmarks encircling Plaza de Mayo.

Plaza de Mayo, Av. Hipólito Yrigoyen, C1087, CABA, Argentina
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11 Casa Rosada and Argentine Flag at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Dominating the east end of Plaza de Mayo is Casa Rosada (The Pink House). Casa de Gobierno is the office for the President of Argentina and the executive branch of the federal government. Flying proudly in front is the flag of Argentina. The one white and two pale blue horizontal stripes were designed by General Manuel Belgrano in 1812. Notice the sun in the center. This is the Official Ceremonial Flag (Bandera Oficial de Ceremonia).

Balcarce 50, C1064, CABA, Argentina
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12 General Belgrano Monument at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Beneath the flagpole is an equestrian statue of General Manuel Belgrano. This national hero was a delegate at the Primera Junta in May of 1810. He was also a major military leader during the Argentine War of Independence. Several of his decisive victories over the Spanish Loyalists – including the improbable win during the Battle of Tucumán in 1812 – paved the way toward the Declaration of Independence in 1816. This bronze monument honoring one of the great Libertadores was erected in 1873.

Plaza de Mayo, Av. Hipólito Yrigoyen, C1087, CABA, Argentina
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13 Casa Rosada Façade at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

If the Argentine president is not in residence, you can walk inside the gates for a closer look at the impressive Italianate Eclectic design of Casa Rosada. The government complex evolved in stages since the late 16th century. Starting in 1594, this was the site of a colonial fort. It was replaced by the Castle of San Miguel in 1720. In 1857, the property was cleared for the construction of the huge Taylor’s Customs House. A post office was added next door in 1879. The two buildings were combined with a central archway in 1898 to form the State House. So why is the building pink? According to legend, President Domingo Sarmiento selected the paint during his administration (1868 – 1874) to appease the Federalist Party (whose color was red) and the white representing the Unitarian Party.

Balcarce 50, C1064, CABA, Argentina
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14 May Pyramid at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

In the center of Plaza de Mayo is a 61.5 foot, white monument named Pirámide de Mayo. The first May Pyramid was constructed in 1811 to celebrate the one-year anniversary of the May Revolution (Revolución de Mayo). During a major renovation in 1856, sculptor Joseph Dubourdieu created the nearly 12 foot image of Liberty, the Roman goddess Libertas. Beneath it is a relief of the Sun of May. This signifies Argentina’s rise as a glorious new nation.

Plaza de Mayo, Av. Hipólito Yrigoyen, C1087, CABA, Argentina
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15 Palace of Legislature at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

In the southwest corner of Plaza de Mayo is this slender, 318 foot clocktower. Three of the five Westminster clock bells are named in honor of the ships in Columbus’ first voyage (Niña, Pinta, and Santa María). There are an additional 30 bells in the carillon. This is the Palace of Legislature for the City of Buenos Aires. The project opened in 1931 to house the city government. Tours are available to see the spectacular halls, legislative chambers and library.

Perú 160, C1067AAD, CABA, Argentina
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16 Buenos Aires Cabildo at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Colonists built the first town council chambers at Plaza Mayor (today’s Plaza de Mayo) in 1610. When Buenos Aires Cabildo became obsolete after 75 years, construction of its replacement dragged on throughout the 18th century. This was the capitol of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata government until they were displaced during the May Revolution in 1810. Inside is a national museum dedicated to this turning point in the history of Buenos Aires and Argentina.

Bolívar 65, C1066, CABA, Argentina
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17 City Hall at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Defining Plaza de Mayo’s northwest edge is Palacio de Gobierno Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires City Hall). Soon after it was finished in 1893, the space was deemed inadequate so an annex was added in 1914. Mayors ran the city here from 1883 until 1996. After an amendment by the Argentine Constitution allowed for more self-governance, the mayor title was changed to the Chief of Government. The chief and vice-chief office in the Buenos Aires City Hall.

Bolívar 1, C1066 AAV, CABA, Argentina
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18 Superintendent of Health Services at Plaza de Mayo in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Across the street from City Hall is a triangular-shaped building housing the Superintendent of Health Services. As the name implies, the mission of this agency is to promote and preserve public health across Argentina. This includes managing the country’s social works, medical insurance, prepaid medicine and health providers.

Av. Pres. Roque Sáenz Peña 530, C1035 AAN, CABA, Argentina
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19 Metropolitan Cathedral Altar at Plaza de Mayo in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Since the late 16th century, six sequential churches have been built on the same site in today’s Plaza de Mayo. You can’t miss the current one. Just look for the dozen Corinthian capitals shaping a Neoclassical portico. This is Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral. It is the mother church of the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires. The cathedral was consecrated in 1791. The façade and its decorations were completed in 1863. Inside of the Latin cross design are biblical frescos on the ceiling and mosaic tiled flooring. Take special note of the high altar. Beneath a canopy of the Holy Trinity is a statue of the Virgin Mary. This was sculpted by Manuel do Coyto in 1671.

San Martín 27, C1004, CABA, Argentina
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20 Metropolitan Cathedral Mausoleum at Plaza de Mayo in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

José de San Martín was the great Liberator of Argentina, Chile and Peru. While in exile, he died in northern France in 1850 at the age of 72. Thirty years later, as specified in his will, his remains were sent to Buenos Aires. San Martín was laid to rest in the right aisle of the Metropolitan Cathedral. The stunning mausoleum was designed by Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse. The three female sculptures are allegories for the countries he freed. Also here is the tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Independence.

San Martín 27, C1004, CABA, Argentina
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21 Banco Nación at Plaza de Mayo in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The last edifice worth noting at Plaza de Mayo shapes the northeastern edge. The Bank of the Argentine Nation is typically called Banco Nación. Soon after the national bank was established in 1891, the existing building of Teatro Colón was purchased as the bank’s headquarters. The current French Neoclassical design by architect Alejandro Bustillo was built between 1949 and 1955. Banco de la Nación Argentina is the country’s largest provider of financial services.

Bartolomé Mitre 326, C1036 AAF, CABA, Argentina
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22 Juan de Garay Monument in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Spanish explorer Pedro de Mendoza founded the first settlement along Rio de la Plata in 1536. His sailors credited Santa Maria de los Buenos Aires (Holy Virgin Mary of the Good Winds) for their safe arrival. After five years of attacks by indigenous people, the encampment was abandoned. In 1580, Spanish conquistador Juan de Garay landed at this location (near Plaza de Mayo and Casa Rosada). Garay christened the harbor Santa Maria de los Buenos Aires. Overtime, the city adopted this name. This nearly ten-foot bronze tribute was sculpted by Gustav Heinrich Eberlein in 1915.

Av. Leandro N. Alem 99, C1003AAA, CABA, Argentina
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23 Escasany House in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Often times, a charming building will whisper hints of its illustrious history while suffering the indignities of its current tenants. Such is the case with Casa Escasany. Above the door is the date July 20, 1892. This is when Escasany House was established. The company grew into the most important and extensive jewelry retailer in Argentina. For decades, this clock played the Westminster Chimes on the quarter-hour. After the business closed in 1978, the building was converted into offices. On the ground floor is a Burger King … a far fall from its former glory.

Rivadavia 620, C1069, CABA, Argentina
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24 Café Tortoni in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The best coffeehouse in Argentina, and often rated among the top ten in the world, is Café Tortoni. Since it was founded in 1858 and modeled after elite 19th century Parisian cafés, this historic landmark has welcomed a very long list of dignitaries and famous people. Enjoy the old-world charm, warm ambiance and impeccable service. The property also hosts tango shows and jazz performances in the basement.

Av. de Mayo 825, C1084, CABA, Argentina
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25 Don Quixote Statue in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Your walking tour of the Monserrat neighborhood extends west along Avenida de Mayo (May Avenue) until you reach 9 de Julio Avenue. July 9 Avenue was named after Argentina’s Independence Day in 1816. You will have no problem knowing when you arrive. The boulevard is 361 feet wide. Take a moment to stare at a 49 foot statue of Don Quixote. This fictional character was created by novelist Miguel de Cervantes in the early 17th century. The statue was the curious, some say totally inappropriate, gift in recognition of the tricentennial of the city’s founding in 1580. On the Ministry of Heath building is a large steel silhouette of Evita (Eva Perón). After the aspiring radio and movie actress met Colonel Juan Perón in 1944, she became his mistress, then wife and finally the First Lady of Argentina when he became president in 1946. She used this platform to create a charitable foundation and led the cause for women’s suffrage. At the height of her popularity in 1951, two million people assembled here chanting for her to run as vice president. She declined because of her secret ill health. The following year she died of cervical cancer at the age of 33. Madonna portrayed Eva Perón in the 1996 movie Evita.

Av. de Mayo 1075, C1002, C1036AAQ, CABA, Argentina
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26 Barolo Palace in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

As you continue along Avenida de Mayo, you will encounter Palacio Barolo. The 22 story Art Nouveau building seems a modest height by today’s standards. Yet its 330 feet qualified as the tallest in South America when it was finished in 1923. Even more noteworthy is architect Mario Palanti’s explanation of the design. His inspiration was the Divine Comedy written by Dante Alighieri in the early 14th century. The basement represents hell. The next 15 floors symbolize purgatory. The upper levels signify heaven. The top implies the nine choirs of angels.

Av. de Mayo 1370, C1085, CABA, Argentina
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27 Inmobiliaria Building in Monserrat, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Stretching for a block along Avenida de Mayo at the east end of Plaza del Congreso is a building with two red cupolas. A closer inspection reveals statues of the mythological gods Apollo and Venus. When this Neo-Renaissance design by architect Luis Broggi opened in 1910, it was called the Heinlein Palace to honor a plumbery of the same name. One of its earliest tenants was far more important. Antonio Devoto’s company, The Real Estate, was Argentina’s first general insurance firm. He became one of Buenos Aires’ most successful businessmen, landowners and philanthropists. In his honor, this is called La Inmobiliaria Building meaning The Real Estate Building.

Av. de Mayo 1477, C1076, CABA, Argentina
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28 Palace of Argentine Congress in Balvanera, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The centerpiece of Congressional Plaza is an elaborate water fountain graced with bronze sculptures by artist Jules Lagae. In the center is the Allegory of the Republic. Called the Monument of the Two Congresses, these sculptures celebrate the centennial anniversary of two assemblies. Together they achieved Argentina’s independence from the Spaniards in 1816. This gorgeous park is one of three squares in front of the Palace of the Argentine National Congress. A green, 260 foot dome crowns the white marble façade. The Neoclassical design by architect Vittorio Meano was finished in 1906. The palace is a National Historic Landmark.

Av. Rivadavia 1864, C1033AAV, CABA, Argentina
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29 Palace of Argentine Congress Sculptures in Balvanera, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The exterior of Palacio del Congreso resembles a sculpture gallery. Argentine artist Lola Mora created 16 magnificent statues. Flanking the Entrada de Honor (Honor Entrance) are two marble ensembles representing Peace, Justice, Liberty and Progress. They were reproduced in 2014. She crafted additional pieces for the interior. High above the pediment and below the green dome is a 26 foot high, bronze quadriga. This equestrian chariot driven by Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory, was the work of Victor de Pol. Art buffs will also want to see an original cast of Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker at Mariano Moreno Plaza in front of the Palace of Argentine National Congress.

Av. Rivadavia 1864, C1033AAV, CABA, Argentina
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30 Confectionery Mill in Balvanera, Buenos Aires, Argentina

While admiring the Palace of Argentine Congress, a curious windmill may catch your eye on the steeple next door. This was the former plant and coffeehouse of a candy manufacturer founded in 1850. The business commissioned architect Francesco Gianotti to create this fanciful new headquarters. Nueva Confitería del Molino opened in 1917. Unfortunately, the once very popular Confectionery Mill closed in 1997. Recently, an Argentine Legislative proposal was approved to restore the building, institute a new confectionery and keep the blades turning on the National Historical Monument.

Av. Rivadavia 1827, C1033AAI, CABA, Argentina
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31 Palace of Justice in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The next neighborhood to explore is San Nicolás. Locals consider it to be the heart of City Centre (El Centro). This district comprises the main shopping area and financial center plus many restaurants, entertainment and cultural options. Your first stop headed back east is the Palace of Justice at Plaza Lavalle. The eight floors of this Neoclassical structure have contained the Supreme Court of Argentina plus the country’s lower courts since opening in 1910. Guided tours are available with prior registration. It is well worth the visit.

Talcahuano 550, C1013, CABA, Argentina
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32 General Juan Lavalle Monument in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Sharing the three-block greenspace with the Palace of Justice is this monument to General Juan Lavalle, the namesake for the park. He was an important leader during the War of the Argentine Independence (1810 – 1825) and subsequent civil wars in neighboring countries. He was murdered at home in 1841. The red cupula and Art Nouveau tower are the remnants of Mirador Massue. Most of this 1903 apartment complex was torn down to make way for the modern Plaza Court Building beside it. Historically, Plaza Lavalle was the scene of a government massacre in 1890. The insurrection was led by a political party called Unión Cívica (Civic Union) against President Miguel Celman. Revolution of the Park resulted in the death of over 300 demonstrators and the president’s resignation.

Av. Corrientes 1145, C1043 AAL, CABA, Argentina
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33 Teatro Colón in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Teatro Colón is a premiere opera house. The venue is rated among the top ten in the world for design and acoustics. Since being established in 1857, Columbus Theatre has hosted an endless list of international singers and conductors. Yet most of their productions are created in-house in conjunction with the city’s philharmonic and ballet companies. The present theater on 9 de Julio Avenue opened in 1908. Since then, it has undergone several expansions and renovations. Be among the nearly 3,000 people who enjoy each spectacular concert, ballet or opera during the season.

Cerrito 628, C1010, CABA, Argentina
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34 Tango Porteño in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The tango began along the Río de Plata in the late 19th century. Since then, Buenos Aires has been the irrefutable capital of this sensational dance and music. You have not experienced the city unless you have enjoyed a professional performance. Tango Porteño on 9 de Julio Avenue is one of many great options for catching a show. This venue takes pride in recreating the Golden Decade of tango from the 1940s.

Cerrito 570, C1010AAL, CABA, Argentina
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35 Obelisk in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The midpoint of the major traffic artery 9 de Julio Avenue (July 9 Avenue) is Plaza de la República. This center medium is punctuated by Obelisco de Buenos Aires. The 235 foot, white concrete obelisk was designed by Alberto Prebisch and finished in 1936. The goal was to help celebrate the quadricentennial of the founding of Buenos Aires by Spanish conquistador Pedro de Mendoza in 1536. The sculpted bushes of the city’s initials make for a great photo opportunity.

Av. 9 de Julio s/n, C1043, CABA, Argentina
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36 Shopping on Florida Street in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Tired of sightseeing? Need a little shopping to boost your spirits? Head southeast along Avenida Roque Sáenz Peña (nicknamed Diagonal Norte). After about four blocks, take a left on Calle Florida (Florida Street). You have entered the main retail district. Along this one-mile, pedestrian-only street is a variety of options. They range from low-end stores and electronic shops to department stores, interesting arcades, luxury-brands, boutiques and high-end fashion. A great choice for young women’s clothing is Argentinian-based Cuesta Blanca. Their flagship store is in the former Gath & Chaves department store built in 1914.

Florida 200, C1005, CABA, Argentina
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37 Former Peña Residence in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Florida Street began as a dirt path in the late 16th century. In 1789, it became the first paved avenue in Buenos Aires. During the late 19th century and early 20th century, this area prospered with mansions and shopkeepers catering to the elite. Those grand residences are gone or unrecognizable. A beautiful exception belonged to the Peña-Blaye family. They commissioned Belgium architect Julio Dormal. He designed many of the city’s landmarks including the Palace of Congress. This façade blends French-inspired elements. They include decorative, wrought-iron balconies and graceful arches with accenting motifs. This is now the headquarters of the Argentine Rural Society.

Florida 460, C1005AAJ, CABA, Argentina
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38 Galerías Pacífico Shopping Arcade in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The undisputed teaser for your credit card is the Galerías Pacífico Shopping Arcade. The 1889, Beaux-Arts complex dominates a block of Florida Street. This was designed for a Parisian department store before housing the National Museum of Fine Arts. The building’s name Edificio Pacífico stems from when it was later owned by the Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway. Inside this mall you can explore over 250 retailers on three floors.

Av. Córdoba 550, C1054, CABA, Argentina
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39 Frescos in Galerías Pacífico Shopping Arcade in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Non-shoppers enjoy visiting the Galerías Pacífico Shopping Arcade to marvel at the magnificent frescos decorating the ceiling. Five famous Argentinian artists of the mid-20th century were commissioned to demonstrate their incredible talents. The ensemble used 4,800 square feet of the interior dome as their canvas. The common theme was to portray the family and nature of different cultures.

Av. Córdoba 550, C1054, CABA, Argentina
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40 Centro Naval in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This shimmering iron, bronze and sculpted granite door at the intersection of Florida and Córdoba will grab your attention. Elegant does not begin to describe it. This only hints at the lavish interior. This is Sede Central, an event facility and headquarters for a social and sports club called Centro Naval (Naval Center). Since its founding in 1882 by young navy officers, the organization has sponsored a rugby team plus several other sports activities. The handsome Beaux-Arts design dates back to 1914.

Florida 801, 1005, CABA, Argentina
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41 Central Bank of Argentina in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A cornerstone of the financial district in San Nicolás is the “Central” building of the Central Bank of Argentina. The headquarters occupy an Italian Renaissance structure completed in 1876. Flanking the clock are two caryatid columns. These female sculptures support the upper broken pediment featuring the National Arms of Argentina.

Reconquista 266, C1003 ABF, CABA, Argentina
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42 Our Lady of Mercy Basilica in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Our Lady of Mercy Church of Buenos Aires began in 1603, less than 25 years after Juan de Garay established the colony in 1580. Construction of the Roman Catholic church started in 1721. The Church of La Merced was not finished until 1900. The interior is graced with large etched columns supporting domes and semi-domes colored with purple hues.

Calle Reconquista 207, CABA, Argentina
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43 Buenos Aires Stock Exchange in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Another national financial institution in El Centro is the Buenos Aires Stock Exchange. The historic headquarters of Bolsa de Comercio de Buenos Aires is located in this 1916 complex about a block from the riverfront. The majority of BCBA’s offices are in the adjacent Edificio Anexo, a 20 story high-rise. The country’s stock exchange was founded in 1854.

Sarmiento 299, C1041AAE, CABA, Argentina
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44 Kirchner Cultural Centre in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

This grand edifice was commissioned in 1889 as a central post office. It is not surprising French architect Norbert Maillart favored a French Second Empire design. When finished in 1928, Secretaría de Comunicaciones was Argentina’s largest building. The interior was lavishly appointed with marble, sculptures, stained glass and an enormous dome. After postal operations moved in 2005, Argentine President Néstor Kirchner proposed the block-square building be repurposed as a cultural center. Kirchner’s dream became a reality a decade later. It was named in his honor. Among the amenities of the Kirchner Cultural Centre are an enormous auditorium, venues for music concerts and theater plus 18 exhibition halls, 40 showrooms, 16 rehearsal rooms and five smaller auditoriums. The Argentine National Symphony Orchestra also resides here. Best of all, attendance to events are free.

Sarmiento 151, C1041 AAE, CABA, Argentina
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45 Juana Azurduy Monument in San Nicolás, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Standing in front of the Kirchner Cultural Centre is this dramatic tribute to Juana Azurduy de Padilla. She was a legendary guerrilla military leader during the Bolivian War of Independence (1809 – 1825). Her passion was sparked by the Spanish cruelty against indigenous people enslaved to work silver mines. Juana Azurduy is portrayed in this 52 foot sculpture carrying a sword awarded after winning a major battle in Upper Peru. The monument, created by sculptor Andres Zerneri, was a gift of Bolivian President Evo Morales in 2015.

Sarmiento 151, C1041 AAE, CABA, Argentina
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46 ARA Uruguay in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires, Argentina

It has been a very long but hopefully exciting day exploring the core of Buenos Aires. You are now back at Puerto Madero where your walking tour began. Reward yourself with cocktails and dinner at one of the fine riverfront restaurants occupying the old warehouses. In the foreground is the ARA Uruguay. This Argentine Navy schooner was launched in 1874, qualifying it as South America’s oldest surviving gunboat. Her illustrious history ended in 1926. ARA Uruguay is permanently moored at old Dock 4 as a museum ship.

Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 516, 1107, CABA, Argentina
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